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ACC97: ASP Query Cannot Be Used with the LIKE Predicate

This article was previously published under Q162977

This article has been archived. It is offered “as is” and will no longer be updated.

Advanced: Requires expert coding, interoperability, and multiuser skills.
When you browse to an Active Server Pages (ASP) file that was exported from
Microsoft Access 97, the Web browser either returns no records or you
receive the following error message:

Expression cannot be used with the LIKE predicate in query expression.

Because ASP files use ActiveX Data Objects (ADO) to communicate with ODBC
drivers in order to query the back-end data, the SQL statements they
contain have different character requirements than typical Microsoft Access
SQL statements. ASP files use the percent sign (%) as a wildcard character
in SQL statements whereas Microsoft Access uses the asterisk (*).

In addition, when Microsoft Access exports a query that contains a
parameter concatenated with a wildcard, the SQL statement that is generated
does not contain the correct sequence and number of delimiters around the
wildcard.

Edit the SQL statements in the ASP files so that they use the percent sign
(%) for wildcards.

If parameter queries with wildcards are exported, edit the SQL statements
in the ASP file so that they use the percent sign (%) as the wildcard along
with the correct sequence and number of delimiters around the wildcard.

NOTE: This section contains information about editing ASP files, and
assumes that you are familiar with editing ASP files. Microsoft Access
Product Support professionals do not support customization of any HTML, HTX,
IDC, or ASP files.

The following example demonstrates how to change the SQL Statement in an
ASP file so that it contains the appropriate wildcard character and the
correct sequence and number of delimiters around the wildcard.

  1. In Microsoft Access 97, open the sample database Northwind.mdb.
  2. Create the following new query called FindName based on the Customers
    table:
           Query: FindName
           ---------------
           Type: Select Query
    
           Field: CompanyName
           Table: Customers
           Criteria: Like EnterName & "*"
    						
  3. On the Query menu, click Parameters.
  4. Type the following in the Query Parameters dialog box, and then click
    OK:
           Parameter          Data Type
           ----------------------------
           EnterName        Text
    						
  5. Save the FindName query and close it.
  6. Select the FindName query in the Database window, and then click
    Save As/Export on the File menu.
  7. In the Save As dialog box, click “To an External File or Database,”
    and then click OK.
  8. In the “Save Query ‘FindName’ In” dialog box, select Microsoft Active
    Server Pages (*.asp) in the Save As Type box, and type FindName.asp in
    the File Name box. Note the folder where the files will be exported
    to. Click Export. The Microsoft Active Server Pages Output Options
    dialog box appears.
  9. In the Data Source Name box, enter the name of a System DSN that
    points to the sample database Northwind.mdb.

    For more information on how to define a system DSN, search the Help
    index for “ODBC, setting up data sources,” and see the following
    article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    159682

    (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/159682/EN-US/
    )

    “Data Source Name Not Found” Err Msg Opening Web Page

  10. In the Server URL box, enter the URL that points to the Web Server
    location where your ASP files will be stored. For example, if you
    store the ASP files in the ASPsamp folder on the PubTest server,
    type as your Server URL. Click OK.
  11. Click OK in the Enter Parameter Value dialog box that appears. Note
    that the ASP output creates two files: FindName.HTML and FindName.ASP.
  12. Copy FindName.HTML and FindName.ASP to a folder on your Web Server
    computer where you have both Read and Execute permission. Read
    permission is necessary to browse the HTML file, and execute
    permission is necessary to run the ASP file.

    For more information about configuring Microsoft Internet Information
    Server (IIS) permissions, please refer to the IIS Help Index, and see
    the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    160754

    (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/160754/EN-US/
    )

    Error “HTTP/1.0 403 Access Forbidden” Browsing IDC Page

  13. Use Notepad or another text editor to open the FindName.ASP file. You
    need to change the SQL Statement so that it will use the appropriate
    sequence of parameter and wildcard characters. Change the SQL
    Statement so that it looks as follows:

    sql = “SELECT Customers.CompanyName From Customers WHERE
    (((Customers.CompanyName) Like ‘” & Request.QueryString(“EnterName”)
    & “%’))”

    Note that the wildcard is a percent sign (%) sign and the sequence in
    which the delimiters were concatenated has changed.

  14. Save the FindName.ASP file and close it.
  15. Start Microsoft Internet Explorer 3.0 or another Web browser program.
  16. Type the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) in the address box of your Web
    browser to view FindName.ASP. For example, if you saved your ASP file
    and your HTML file in a folder called Test in the wwwroot folder of
    your Web Server, type:

    http:///test/FindName.html

    Note that the URL depends upon where your files are located on the Web
    Server.

  17. The FindName.HTML form opens in your Web browser with an EnterName
    box and a Run Query button. Type the letter M
    in the box, and then click the Run Query button. Note that all
    records with names that begin with “M” are returned.
For more information about exporting ASP files, search the Help Index for
“ASP files,” or ask the Microsoft Access 97 Office Assistant. In addition,
please refer to your ASP online documentation.
Note This is a “FAST PUBLISH” article created directly from within the Microsoft support organization. The information contained herein is provided as-is in response to emerging issues. As a result of the speed in making it available, the materials may include typographical errors and may be revised at any time without notice. See Terms of Use

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151500)

for other considerations.

Article ID: 162977 – Last Review: October 24, 2013 – Revision: 1.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Access 97 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Internet Information Server 3.0
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbbug kberrmsg kbinterop KB162977

Originally posted here:
ACC97: ASP Query Cannot Be Used with the LIKE Predicate

How to troubleshoot fatal system errors in Access 2002 running on Windows Millennium

This article was previously published under Q284152

This article has been archived. It is offered “as is” and will no longer be updated.

Moderate: Requires basic macro, coding, and interoperability skills.

This article applies to a Microsoft Access database (.mdb) and to a Microsoft Access project (.adp).


This article discusses the causes of fatal system errors in Microsoft Access 2002 running on Windows Millennium Edition (Windows Me), and provides general troubleshooting steps for solving them.

Note This is a general article. The Microsoft Knowledge Base may have a specific article that addresses the exact error that you are experiencing. To see if a specific article exists, search the Microsoft Knowledge Base on the exact text of the error message. To search the Microsoft Knowledge Base, visit the following Microsoft Web site:

For more information about how to troubleshoot fatal system errors on Microsoft Windows 2000, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

294301

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/294301/
)

How to troubleshoot fatal system errors in Access 2002 running on Microsoft Windows 2000

Usually, a fatal system error, which may be an invalid page fault, a STOP error, a fatal exception error, or an application exception error, will cause a Windows-based application such as Microsoft Access to stop responding or to fail. This article focuses on such errors in Windows Me. In some rare cases, such an error may cause your operating system to stop responding. Overall, there are two basic causes for fatal errors:

  • Something unexpected has happened within the Windows environment;
    typically an improper memory address. For example, an application or a Windows component might read or write to a memory location that has not been allocated to it (memory that it does not own), potentially overwriting and corrupting other program code in that area of memory.
  • Parameters that are not valid have been passed between applications and the Windows environment. Invalid parameters can cause invalid instructions to be executed, resulting in page faults. This is usually the result of the application’s internal program code incorrectly passing specific data that could not be correctly interpreted by Windows or a Windows-based application.

Because these causes are general, you may need to try several
troubleshooting steps to find the specific cause of such an error in Microsoft Access. You can begin by investigating the following application-related problems:

  • A confirmed bug in Microsoft Access
  • A damaged database
  • A fragmented database
  • A corrupted database
  • Incorrect Registry settings
  • Mismatched dynamic link libraries (.dll files)

If you determine that the cause is none of these, you can investigate
the following system-related problems:

  • A memory conflict
  • Incorrect or crowded Temp folder
  • Incompatible or corrupted video driver
  • A printer driver or settings problem
  • Incorrect virtual memory settings
  • Incorrect file-system settings
  • Hard disk fragmentation or disk errors

These application-related and system-related problems, and the steps to
troubleshoot them, are discussed in the following sections.

Application-related problems

Confirmed bug in Microsoft Access

A fatal system error is occasionally caused by a bug in a program. The error that you may see in this case may look like the following:

Microsoft Access has encountered a problem and needs to close. We are
sorry for the inconvenience.

You can view details on the error by clicking the text “click here.” There you find information such as which file was involved in the error and the memory offset at which the error occurred.

You can find more information about any known Microsoft Access problems that may cause fatal system errors by searching on the following words in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

page fault

For more information about error messages in Windows Me, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

264938

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/264938/
)

How to examine detailed error messages in Windows Millennium Edition

Damaged or fragmented database

If a fatal system error only occurs when you open or use a particular database file, use the Compact and Repair Database command in Access to correct any potential problems caused by damage or excessive fragmentation of the database structure. To use the Compact and Repair Database command, follow these steps:

  1. Close the database. If you are in a multi-user environment, confirm that all users have also closed the database.
  2. Make a backup copy of the database. You can use Windows Explorer to do so. However, Microsoft recommends that you routinely copy the database to another medium, such as to another hard disk, to backup tape, to removable hard disk, or to a network drive for safe keeping. When you work with Microsoft Access databases (*.mdb), you should also create a backup of the workgroup information file (*.mdw file). Microsoft Access stores each user’s preferences and security account
    information in this file. If this file is lost or damaged, you may not be able to start Microsoft Access until you restore or rebuild this file.

    You can back up individual database objects by creating a blank database and then importing the objects that you want from the original database.

  3. On the Tools menu, point to Database Utilities, and then click Compact and Repair Database.
  4. Specify the name and location of the database that you want to repair.

Note After you run the Compact and Repair Database command, if your database behaves unpredictably or if you receive a fatal system error (either immediately or after continued use), try the additional troubleshooting steps that are described in this article to find the cause of the page fault.

Note It is a good idea to run the Compact and Repair Database command on a regular basis.

Corrupted database

If the Compact and Repair Database command does not solve unpredictable behavior or application-related fatal system errors, try creating a new database, importing objects from the old database, and compiling all modules in the new database.

Note This method is not recommended if your database is a replica in a replica set. If your replica is corrupted, it is better to create a new replica from the Design Master.

To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Create a new Access 2002 database.
  2. On the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Import.
  3. In the Import dialog box, make sure to select Microsoft Access in the Files of type list.
  4. In the Look in box, select the drive and folder that stores the Microsoft Access database that you want to import.
  5. Select the file, and then click Import.
  6. Click one or more objects to import. You may want to select only one or a few objects at a time to make it easier to identify any corrupted objects.
  7. Click OK to import the selected objects. If an object generates an error while it is being imported, the object is probably damaged beyond repair. In this case, you must import the object from a backup database or re-create the object from scratch. The error may also have prevented other objects from being imported. Repeat steps 2 through 6 until you have imported all the other objects into the new database. One method that you can use is to import all tables, then all forms, then reports, and so on. If an error occurs within a group of objects, try to import smaller blocks of objects or even one object at a time (depending on how many you have) from that group until you find the object or objects that cause an error.
  8. Compile all the imported modules in the new database. To do so, follow these steps:
    1. In the Database window, click Modules under Objects.
    2. Select a module, and then click Design.
    3. On the Debug menu, click Compile database name.
  9. Quit Microsoft Access.

Note If your original database has references to libraries or projects (or both), you should make a note of the references. Then open an existing or a new VBA module in your new database, and on the Tools menu, click References to add the same references to your new database.

If a damaged, a fragmented, or a corrupted database was the cause of the unpredictable behavior or application-related page, you should not see these problems the next time that you run Microsoft Access and open this new database. If you do see the same problems in the new database, try the additional troubleshooting steps that are described in this article to find the cause of the problem.

For more information about what to do if the database has become corrupted, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

283849

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/283849/
)

How to troubleshoot and to repair a damaged Access 2002 or later database

Damaged installation

The problems that you are seeing may be related to the way Access 2002 is installed on your computer. If you have another computer available that has Access 2002 installed, try your database there. If you suspect that the cause of a fatal system error or unpredictable behavior in Microsoft Access is application-related (meaning it is not any particular database), it may result from such things as incorrect settings in the registry or from one or more missing or corrupted Office XP files. In this case, you can reset or rebuild the Office installation.

To repair the installation, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. In Control Panel, double-click Add Remove Programs.
  3. In the Add Remove Programs dialog box, if yours is a stand-alone version of Access, click Microsoft Access 2002. If you installed Access as part of Microsoft Office XP Professional, click Microsoft Office XP Professional.
  4. Click Add/Remove.
  5. On the first Setup page, click Repair Office.
  6. If you are prompted, insert the CD for Microsoft Access 2002 or Office XP. You may not be prompted if you installed from a network.
  7. Continue through Setup until the repair is finished.
  8. When Setup is finished, start Microsoft Access again, and then perform the same steps that caused the error. If you still receive a fatal system error or if Access behaves unpredictably (either immediately or after continued use), you should try the additional troubleshooting steps that are described in this article to find the cause.
If repairing the installation did not solve the problem, try removing Microsoft Access 2002 or Microsoft Office XP Professional. To remove and then reinstall the installation, follow these steps:
  1. Remove Access 2002 or Office XP Professional:
    1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
    2. In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs. The Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box appears.
    3. Select the program to uninstall, and then click Add/Remove.
    4. Follow the instructions to remove all of the programs.
  2. Reinstall Access 2002 or Office XP Professional:
    1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
    2. In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs. The Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box appears.
    3. In the dialog box, click Install.
    4. Follow the instructions in the installer.

System-related problems

This section discusses system-related causes for fatal system errors in Windows Me.

Memory conflict

A common cause of fatal system errors is a memory conflict involving a
device driver, a system component, or some other loaded file. To troubleshoot a memory conflict, the first step is to restart your computer in Safe mode.

Start the computer Safe mode

Safe mode bypasses startup files, including the registry, Config.sys,
Autoexec.bat, and the Boot and 386Enh sections of the System.ini, and
provides you with access to the configuration files. Only essential system files and device drivers (such as mouse, keyboard, and standard VGA) are loaded. This makes Safe mode useful for isolating and solving memory conflicts.

Start Windows Me in Safe mode:

  1. Click Start, and then click Shut Down.
  2. Click Restart, and then click OK.
  3. Hold down the CTRL key until the Microsoft Windows Startup Menu appears.

    Note On some computers, you can use F8 instead of CTRL to display the Microsoft Windows Startup Menu.

  4. Enter the number for Safe mode, and then press ENTER.
  5. In Safe mode, Windows uses default settings (VGA monitor, Microsoft mouse driver, and the minimum device drivers required to start Windows). You are connected to your network, and you do not have access to CD-ROM drives, printers, or other devices. You can change settings as needed by clicking Start, pointing to Settings, clicking Control Panel, and then double-clicking Network or System. If these items do not appear, click to view all Control Panel options.
  6. After Windows Me is finished loading in Safe mode, open Microsoft Access, and try to reproduce the fatal system error.
  7. After you finish checking your system in Safe mode, restart your computer to run Windows in normal mode.

If you cannot reproduce the fatal system error in Safe mode, the cause could still be system or file related. Continue with the troubleshooting steps below.

Start the computer by using line-by-line confirmation

Try restarting your computer and stepping through the startup commands line by line. For more information about this technique, refer to the Windows Me Help file as follows:

  1. Click Start, and then click Help
  2. In the Search box, type confirm startup commands, and then click Go.
  3. Click the “To confirm startup commands line by line” topic to view it.

Try to perform a clean boot of your computer. For information about how to perform a clean boot of Windows Me, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

267288

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/267288/
)

How to perform a clean boot in Windows Millennium Edition

Additionally, you can try the other troubleshooting steps that are discussed in this article.

Check for a valid temporary folder and delete temporary files

It is essential to have adequate free disk space available on the hard disk that contains the temporary folder. A good rule is to have free disk space that is twice the size of your largest production database. For instance, if the database is 8 MB (megabytes) in size, the free disk space should be at least 16 MB.

Temporary files should be created and then deleted as needed, but sometimes they are not deleted and remain in the temp folder. Extra unneeded temporary files can mount up and take up disk space. The following steps detail how to check for a valid temporary directory and also how to delete any temporary files.

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Information.
  2. On the Tools menu, click System Configuration Utility.
  3. Click the Environment tab, and then look for the TEMP variable.
  4. If the TEMP variable is missing, click New. Type TEMP for Variable Name, and C:WindowsTemp for Variable Value, and then click OK.

    If the TEMP variable is present but the path is incorrect, click Edit and type a valid path for the Variable Value. Then click OK.

    Note If a temp folder does not exist on your disk, you must open Windows Explorer and create a temp folder in the Windows folder.

  5. If the TEMP variable is not selected, click to select the check box for the TEMP variable.
  6. Repeat steps 1 through 5 for the TMP variable as well.
  7. Click OK, and then click No if you are prompted to restart your computer.
  8. Insert your Windows Me startup disk in your disk drive.
  9. Click Start, and then click Shut Down. Make sure Restart is selected in the list. Click OK.
  10. After you restart Windows to a command prompt, type the following, and then press ENTER after each line:

    c:
    cdwindowstemp

    If the cdwindowstemp folder does not exist, you must create the
    folder. You can create the temporary folder on your hard disk by typing the following line at the command prompt:

    md c:windowstemp

  11. Delete any temporary files in this folder. Temporary files typically
    have a .tmp extension. To delete these files, type the following line
    and then press ENTER:

    del *.tmp

Note Do not delete these files when you are running Windows, because Windows or a Windows-based program may be using one of these files.

In Windows Me, you can delete many unused or temporary files with the Disk Cleanup tool.

For more information about this tool, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

186099

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/186099/
)

Description of the Disk Cleanup tool

Video problem

Occasionally, in Microsoft Access, you can experience page faults or
unpredictable screen behavior, because of a video driver conflict or an
incorrect graphics hardware setting for your system.

Video Driver Conflict

To troubleshoot a video driver conflict, change your system’s video adapter to Standard VGA, which should work with most monitors. To do so, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Display.
  2. Click the Settings tab, click Advanced, click the Adapter tab, and then click Change.
  3. Click Next, click Display a list of all the drivers in a specific location, so you can select the driver you want, and then click Next.
  4. Click Show All Hardware, click Standard Display Types in the Manufacturer box, click Standard Display Adapter (VGA) in the Models box, and then click Next.
  5. Click Yes, click Next, and then click Finish.
  6. Click Close, click Close, and then click Yes when you are prompted to restart your computer.

    If changing your video adapter to the Standard VGA driver resolves the issue, contact your video adapter manufacturer to inquire about the availability of an updated Windows Me video adapter driver.

    For more information about how to troubleshoot display problems, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    127139

    (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/127139/
    )

    Troubleshooting video problems in Windows

Printer driver problem

If you are trying to print in Microsoft Access or if you are trying to print preview an Access object when you get a fatal error, the problem may be caused by the printer driver (the software that runs your printer). The driver may be corrupted or may be incompatible with some other software on your computer.

Note In rare cases, a corrupted database may cause printing problems. Therefore, before troubleshooting the printer driver, please try the same print operation on another database on that computer or, if you share the printer with other computers, take your database to another computer and try printing or previewing it there. If you find that this database is the only one on which the error occurs, it could be a corrupted database.

Testing with the Generic/Text Only driver

To test whether you have a problem with your print driver, try the Generic/Text Only driver. To do so, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Printers.
  2. Double-click the Add Printer icon and follow the instructions in the Add Printer Wizard to install the Generic/Text Only printer driver.
  3. Try to print from Microsoft Access with this driver.

Note If the printing problems exist for Generic/Text Only driver as well as another driver, the problem is most likely not driver-specific.
However, if the printing problem seems to be corrected by using a different printer driver, follow these steps to remove and reinstall the first printer driver:

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Printers.
  2. Right-click the printer that you want to remove, and then click Delete.
  3. If you are prompted to remove all the files associated with the
    printer, click Yes.
  4. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Printers.
  5. Double-click the Add Printer icon and follow the instructions in the Add Printer Wizard to reinstall the original printer driver.

    Note If reinstalling the printer driver does not resolve the error or errors, try using a different driver or the Generic/Text Only driver again. In the meantime, you should contact the printer driver manufacturer to report the problem and find out if an updated driver is available.

Virtual memory settings

If you have already tried deleting unnecessary files, and you still have a performance problem, try changing the Windows default virtual memory settings.

If you have more than one drive available, you may get better performance if you specify that Windows locate the swap file on a drive other than the default in the following cases:

  • If the default drive doesn’t have much free disk space, and another local drive has more space available.
  • If another local drive is available that is faster than the current drive (unless that disk is already heavily used).

You also may get better performance if you specify that the minimum disk space available for virtual memory is at least twice the size of available RAM. For example, if a computer has 20 MB of RAM, you should specify at least 40 MB of virtual memory. You may want to specify more if several large applications will be running at the same time.

For information about changing Windows virtual memory settings, see the
“virtual memory settings” topic in Windows Help.

For more information about virtual memory, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

128327

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/128327/
)

How Windows 95 manages virtual memory

Check the hard disk for disk errors and fragmentation

Use the Scandisk program to check the hard disk for lost clusters and
other file allocation table (FAT) errors and to test the hard disk
integrity. You can also use the Scandisk program to repair any of these
problems. To run Scandisk, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, point to Programs,
    point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Scandisk.
  2. Click the drive that you want to check for errors, and then
    click Start.

Hard disks that are very fragmented can affect the performance and
reliability of Office programs and other tasks in Windows. To
resolve this problem, run Disk Defragmenter to defragment the hard disk
drive. To run Disk Defragmenter, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Disk Defragmenter.
  2. Click the drive that you want to defragment in the Which
    drive do you want to defragment
    list, and then click OK.

Check for a damaged swap file

Fatal errors may also appear if your Windows swap file is
corrupted. To create a new swap file, restart the computer with the Windows Me startup disk, delete the Win386.swp file in the Windows folder, and then restart the
computer. To create a new swap file, follow these steps:

  1. Insert the Windows Me startup disk in the floppy disk drive.
  2. Click Shut Down on the Start menu. Click Restart and then click OK.
  3. On the menu, select Minimal Boot, and then press ENTER.
  4. At the MS-DOS prompt, change to the Windows folder by typing the
    following commands and pressing ENTER after each command:

    drive:
    cd drive:Windows

    Note drive is the drive letter that contains the Windows folder. Typically, this is drive C.

    Note The swap file exists in the Windows folder if Windows manages
    virtual memory settings on your computer. If you chose to manage
    virtual memory settings on the computer, the swap file will be on the root of the hard disk. To determine whether Windows manages
    virtual memory settings, right-click My Computer, click Properties,
    click Performance, and then click Virtual Memory.

  5. To delete the swap file, type the following:


    del Win386.swp

  6. After you delete the swap file, restart Windows Me.

Scan for viruses

If you have tried most other trouble-shooting steps in this article, it may be time to scan the hard disk and floppy disks with a virus detector. If the virus detector finds a virus on your computer, remove the virus before you run Access again.
If you do not have virus detection software, please contact a software vendor to purchase one.

Check for registry damage

Windows includes a tool called Registry Checker that can scan your
registry for damage and, if necessary, restore a backup of the
registry. To use Registry Checker to scan your registry, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, point to Programs,
    point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Information.
  2. On the Tools menu, click Registry Checker. You may see the following error message:

    Windows encountered an error accessing the system registry. Windows will restart the computer and repair the system registry for you.

    If you see this error message, go to step 3. If there was no error message, you can choose to create a backup of the registry. You do not need to complete the remaining steps.

  3. Close all programs.
  4. On the Start menu click Run.
  5. In the Open box, type the following line, and then click OK:

    scanreg /fix

    Note that you receive a dialog box that indicates that in order rebuild the registry, you must restart Windows.

  6. Click Yes. After the rebuild is finished, the computer restarts.

For more information about the Registry Checker tool, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

183887

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/183887/
)

Description of the Windows Registry Checker tool (Scanreg.exe)

183603

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/183603/
)

How to customize Registry Checker tool settings

How to obtain assistance for Windows Me

If you are troubleshooting fatal system errors with Access 2002 in Windows Me and this article does not resolve the issue, contact Microsoft Product Support Services. For more information about support options, visit the following Microsoft Web site:

In Product Help

Windows Me has “Help and Support,” a tool that is designed to make it easier for you to find help “inside” your computer. To run “Help and Support,” click Start, click Help, and then either browse the tool or type what you are looking for in the Search box, and then click Go.

For more information about fatal exception errors, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

150314

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/150314/
)

What are fatal exception errors

Note This is a “FAST PUBLISH” article created directly from within the Microsoft support organization. The information contained herein is provided as-is in response to emerging issues. As a result of the speed in making it available, the materials may include typographical errors and may be revised at any time without notice. See Terms of Use

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151500)

for other considerations.

Article ID: 284152 – Last Review: October 24, 2013 – Revision: 1.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Access 2002 Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbtshoot kbhowto KB284152

View original post here:
How to troubleshoot fatal system errors in Access 2002 running on Windows Millennium

"Access 2002 Upsizing Tools" white paper is available in Download Center

The Access 2002 Upsizing Tools white paper (Upsize02.doc) describes how to use the Upsizing Tools included in Access 2002. Use the document as an aid in preparing to migrate the data in an Access 2002 database to SQL Server, creating a client/server application from an Access 2002 database, and troubleshooting errors in the upsizing process itself.

The following file is available for download from the Microsoft Download Center:

Collapse this imageExpand this image

Download Upsize02.exe now

(http://download.microsoft.com/download/Access2002/whitep/2002/WIN98Me/EN-US/Upsize02.exe)

The Upsize02.exe file contains the following file:

   Upsize02.doc  A Microsoft Word document
				

For additional information about how to download Microsoft Support files, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

119591

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/119591/EN-US/
)

How to Obtain Microsoft Support Files from Online Services

Microsoft scanned this file for viruses. Microsoft used the most current virus-detection software that was available on the date that the file was posted. The file is stored on security-enhanced servers that help to prevent any unauthorized changes to the file.

The Access 2002 Upsizing Tools white paper contains the following topics:

  • INTRODUCTION
  • FEATURES AND ENHANCEMENTS
    • Creating New Client/Server Applications
    • Unattended Upsizing
      • Tables Automatically Renamed
      • Automatic Log Truncation

    • Linked Tables Can Be Upsized
    • Error Message Text for Triggers
    • Hidden Objects Are Not Upsized
    • Upsizing Report
      • Error Details
      • Automatic Snapshot Report

  • THE UPSIZING PROCESS
  • PREPARING YOUR DATABASE FOR UPSIZING
    • Jet Security Settings Not Migrated
    • Permissions Necessary to Upsize
    • User Defined VBA Function Are Not Upsized
    • Not All Queries Can Be Re-created on SQL Server

  • UPSIZING TABLES
    • Migration of Jet Extended Properties
    • Table and Field Validation Migration
    • Default Value and Validation Rule Properties
      • ValidationText Property
      • Caption Property
      • AllowZeroLength Property
      • Required Property
      • Indexed Property

    • Data Types
    • Lookup Fields
    • Relation Migration Of Foreign Keys

  • UPSIZING QUERIES
    • Queries That Are Not Upsized
    • Query Extended Properties
    • Upsizing Queries That Contain Access VBA Functions
    • How Queries Are Upsized
    • Select Queries
    • Union Queries
    • Action Queries
    • Queries That Are Upsized But May Not Run
      • Update Queries Based on Sorted Queries
      • UniqueRecords Property May Not Upsize
      • Upsized Make-Table Queries
      • Upsized Append Queries

  • UPSIZING FORMS
    • Properties
    • How Forms Are Upsized
    • Record Source with Parameters
    • Row Source with Parameters
    • Converting Form Filter Property to Server Filter

  • UPSIZING REPORTS
  • MISCELLANEOUS ISSUES
    • Upsizing Modules
    • Upsizing Data Access Objects
    • Upsizing Charts
    • Naming Issues
    • Structure Only

  • RUNNING THE UPSIZING WIZARD
    • Gathering Necessary Information
    • Running the Wizard
    • Step 1: New or Existing SQL Server Database?
    • Selecting a New SQL Server Database
    • Selecting an Existing SQL Server Database
    • Step 2: Exporting Tables to SQL Server
    • Step 3: Table Attributes and Other Options
    • Indexes
    • Clustered and Non-Clustered Indexes
    • Validation Rules
    • Table Relationships
    • Timestamps
    • Structure Only
    • Step 4: Application Changes
      • Create a New Access Client/Server Applications
      • Link SQL Server Tables to Existing Applications
      • No Application Changes

    • Step 5: Opening the MDB or ADP
    • The Upsizing Report

  • FOR MORE INFORMATION
Note This is a “FAST PUBLISH” article created directly from within the Microsoft support organization. The information contained herein is provided as-is in response to emerging issues. As a result of the speed in making it available, the materials may include typographical errors and may be revised at any time without notice. See Terms of Use

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151500)

for other considerations.

Article ID: 294407 – Last Review: October 24, 2013 – Revision: 1.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Access 2002 Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbdownload kbfile kbgraphxlinkcritical kbhowto KB294407

See the article here:
"Access 2002 Upsizing Tools" white paper is available in Download Center

XL: CELL Function with "filename" No Longer Volatile

In the versions of Microsoft Excel listed at the beginning of this article, the CELL worksheet function may not update automatically.

NOTE: This behavior differs from that in Microsoft Excel for Windows 95, version 7.0 and earlier.

This problem occurs when you do the following:

  • You use the CELL function with “filename” for the info_type argument.

    -and-

  • You click Save As on the File menu and change the
    file name, file type, or file location so that the path or file name
    changes.
To work around this problem, use either of the following methods:

  • Press F9 to update the CELL worksheet function.

    -or-

  • Recalculate the worksheet. To do this, follow these steps:
    1. On the Tools menu, click Options.
    2. Click the Calculation tab.
    3. Click Calc Now (F9).
Microsoft has confirmed that this is a problem in the Microsoft products that are listed at the beginning of this article.
For more information about the CELL worksheet function, click Microsoft Excel Help on the Help menu, type cell worksheet function in the Office Assistant or the Answer Wizard, and then click Search to view the topic.
Note This is a “FAST PUBLISH” article created directly from within the Microsoft support organization. The information contained herein is provided as-is in response to emerging issues. As a result of the speed in making it available, the materials may include typographical errors and may be revised at any time without notice. See Terms of Use

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151500)

for other considerations.

Article ID: 211370 – Last Review: October 24, 2013 – Revision: 1.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Excel 2000 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Excel 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Excel 97 Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbpending kbprb KB211370

View article:
XL: CELL Function with "filename" No Longer Volatile

Description of new features and enhancements in Access 2002

Access 2002 has addressed a variety of customer requests by making enhancements and behavior fixes. There are also some new features available. This article discusses these changes.
PivotChart and PivotTable Views

Microsoft Access 2002 introduces PivotTable and PivotChart views to tables, queries, views, stored procedures, functions, and forms. You can now perform data analysis and build rich PivotTable and PivotChart view solutions more quickly than ever before. PivotTable and PivotChart views can be saved as data access pages that can be viewed by anyone who has Microsoft Internet Explorer 5 or later. You can also use subforms in PivotTable and PivotChart views in exactly the same fashion that they are used with forms in Datasheet view today. Developers will also find it easy to write code behind forms in PivotTable and PivotChart views and take advantage of new events available in PivotTable and PivotChart views.

XML Support

In addition to being the standard technology for interchanging data on the Web, Extensible Markup Language (XML) is quickly becoming the preferred technology for exchanging data between business software applications. Microsoft Access 2002 provides powerful, intuitive ways of sharing XML data regardless of differences in the platform, data format, protocol, schema, or business rules. By using the familiar user interface of Access, you can easily create XML data or schema documents from Jet or SQL Server structures and data. The schema created by Access will contain Access-specific information that may require transformation by your application.

You can also import XML data from other applications to use in forms, reports and data access pages within your database. Access also provides methods for easily controlling your data by making it simple to create and apply schemas and style sheets. Access allows you to easily describe and deliver rich, structured XML data to and from any application in a standard, consistent way. For example, you can use Access to create a schema that describes the structure of your data and then send the schema to your vendors so that they know exactly how to expect your data to appear in their invoices.

Extended Property Support with Microsoft SQL Server 2000

The built-in integration between Microsoft Access 2002 and Microsoft SQL Server 2000 has been improved significantly by the inclusion of support for extended SQL database properties from within your Access project. By using extended properties in your Access 2002 projects, you can implement such features as lookup relationships, validation rules (also called constraints), text formatting, and subdatasheets. You can use extended properties with tables, views, stored procedures, and functions, just like you can with similar objects in Access data files. Using extended properties makes it easy to save column widths, row heights, fonts, and input mask settings from one Access project session to another. Extended properties make it even easier to migrate your business applications from Access databases to Access projects connected to Microsoft SQL Server.

Round-Tripping

You can now work with and modify Access 2000 files in Access 2002 without converting the file format. This allows you to easily share different versions of database files with other Access users.

Multiple Undo and Redo

You now have the ability to undo and redo multiple actions in Design view in all objects in your Microsoft Access databases and in views, stored procedures, and functions in your Microsoft Access project.

Updateable Off-line Data Access Pages

You can now take the data access pages in your Access project off-line, make changes to them on your laptop, and have them automatically synchronize when you reconnect to the SQL server. Changes to the off-line pages are made to an Access project connected to a local Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine (formerly known as MSDE (Microsoft Data Engine)).

Conversion Error Logging

If problems are encountered when you convert from Access 95 or a later version, Access 2002 will now create a table that lists information about each error, making it much easier to identify and solve problems.

Subforms/Subreports That Live in Design view

You can now open subforms or subreports in their own Design view window directly from within the form or report or from the View menu. Scrolling has also been improved so that it is easier to work with subforms and subreports in Design view.

Password Security in an Access Project

You can now change the logon password specified in an Access project connected to a Microsoft SQL Server 6.5 or later version database directly from your Access 2002 menu.

The Linked Table Wizard

The Linked Table Wizard guides you through the process of creating a link in your Access project to an external OLE DB data source. The wizard creates a view in your SQL Server Database for each linked table.

Improved Support for International Complex-Scripts

Access 2002 now exposes complex-script interface items easily, which means that with a simple click, you can switch the reading direction from left-to-right to right-to-left in language-specific objects.

Improved Accessibility Features

Access 2002 now provides even greater ease in working with forms and reports.

  • Pressing F8 in form or report Design will now display the field list.
  • Pressing ENTER after selecting a field in the field list in form or report Design view will automatically add the field to the form or report design surface.
  • Pressing CTRL+TAB will move the focus from a form or report section to a subsection.
  • Two additional powers (1000% and 500%) have been added to the Zoom option in print preview.

Allow Report Design/Preview, Conversion, and Datasheet Formatting Without a Printer Installed

In earlier versions of Access, you cannot design reports, view reports in Print or Layout preview, convert databases, or use the Datasheet Font dialog box without a default printer installed. This is because the device context information is required to determine fonts, page sizes and margins.

Logic has been added to Access 2002 to allow you to perform these four functions regardless of whether or not a printer is installed. This is accomplished by using default values for settings such as page size and screen fonts.

Design Surface Drop-Down Control Enhancements

In earlier versions of Access, when a control is selected in the form or report designer, the Object, Font, and Font Size drop-down boxes show the control name, font, and font size for the selected control. However, when you click the drop-down box, it always displays an ascending list of values starting at the beginning of the list, even if the value for the selected control falls outside these values.

Access 2002 scrolls the displayed values so that the selected control is selected in the Control drop-down box, the font in the Font drop-down box, and the font size in the Font Size drop-down box.

If the value in any of the three drop-down boxes is not available, Access 2002 operates as in earlier versions and displays the list of acceptable values from the beginning of the list. If the drop-down boxes must be scrolled to display the selected control, control font, or control font size, the list is scrolled far enough up or down to display the selected item.

Added a Select Object Drop-Down Box on the Property Sheet

Access 2002 has added a Select Object drop-down box to the top of the property sheet for the form and report designer property sheets only. It allows you to browse from object to object and change properties without ever leaving the property sheet.

Added a Browse Button to Append and Make-Table Dialog Boxes

A Browse button has been added to the Append and Make-Table query dialog boxes in Access 2002 so that you do not have to type a correct path and file name when the query appends to or makes a table in another database. The Browse button is disabled unless you select the Another Database option.

Display the Path of a Linked Table as a Tool Tip

When you hold the mouse pointer over a linked table in Access 2002, a tool tip is displayed. The tool tip shows the path to the linked table, whether it is an absolute path, a UNC path, or an ODBC link. For ODBC links, the tool tip shows the connection information, which is the same information contained in the Description property of the table.

Display the Table Name for Make-Table and Append Queries as a Tool Tip

Access 2002 displays a tool tip with the name of the table that a Make-Table or Append query generates when it is run. The tool tip appears when you hover over one of these query types. The tool tip displays both the path to the database and the table name if the destination table is another database.

Added Linked Table Manager to Shortcut Menu

A Linked Table Manager option has been added to the shortcut menu for linked tables in the Database window. When you right-click a local Access table, the Linked Table Manager option is disabled.

Added Conditional Formatting to Shortcut Menu

A Conditional Formatting option has been added to the shortcut menu for text boxes and combo boxes in the form and report designers.

Added Unfreeze Column to Shortcut Menu

An Unfreeze All Columns option now appears in the shortcut menu for columns in Datasheet view. It appears below the Freeze Columns option.

Display the Current Printer as Tool Tip for the Printer button

In earlier versions of Access, the word “Print” is displayed as a tool tip when you hold the mouse pointer over the Print button. Access 2002 displays both “Print” along with the currently selected printer. When you hold the mouse pointer over a report in the Database window, the name of the printer is displayed as a tool tip. This is useful because each report can be set to print to a different printer.

Added a Page Setup button to the Print Preview Toolbar

A Setup button has been added to the Print Preview toolbar. When the button is pressed, the Page Setup dialog box is opened. The Page Setup button is only available from Print Preview and Layout Preview. It is not available while in Design view.

Changed the Button for Database Objects Dragged to a Toolbar to Image and Text

When customizing menu bars and toolbars in Access 2000, the default behavior creates a button with an image. This image is the picture used to represent the corresponding object type. This behavior can be a bit confusing because dragging two forms to a toolbar or menu bar results in two buttons with the picture that represents forms.

Access 2002 creates the button with an image and text. The image is the picture that corresponds with the object type. The text is the object name.

Added New Hotkeys

   Hotkey       Description
   ---------------------------------------------------------
   CTRL+> or    Toggles between views.
   CTRL+< 

   F4           Opens and puts focus in the property sheet. 

   F7           Open the code or macro window for the
                object with the focus. 

   SHIFT+F7     Moves focus from code window back to the
                designer without changing the control focus.
				
  • In an Access 2002 Form or Report property sheet with the focus on any of the properties, F7 open the Visual Basic Editor to show the code for the form or report.

    The behavior of F7 while focus is in the designer depends on a couple of factors. If the option Always use event procedures is enabled the Visual Basic Editor opens to the default event procedure for the selected object. The event procedure is created is it does not already exist. The exception to this is when the default event procedure is set to a macro. In this case, the macro is opened.

    If the option Always use event procedures is disabled and the default event of the selected object is set to an event procedure or a macro, the Visual Basic Editor opens to the event procedure or the macro is opened. If the default event of the selected control is not set, the Choose Builder dialog box is presented.

  • If you are in a designer, F4 opens the property sheet for the selected control if it is not already open and puts the focus on the property sheet. This works in .mdb and .adp files anywhere where there is a property sheet. F4 still expands the drop-down box for properties that apply when focus is in the property on the property sheet.
  • When you are in a designer property sheet, SHIFT+F7 moves the window focus back to the design surface without changing the control focus. This works in .mdb and .adp files anywhere where there is a property sheet.
  • When you are working with any table, query, form, report, page, view, function, or stored procedure, CTRL+> or CTRL+< allows you to toggle between views. If there are two possible views, either keystroke takes you to the next view. If there are three views, the CTRL+> takes you to the next view, looping back to the first view in the list if you are already on the third view. The CTRL+< has the opposite behavior. This works in all views.

Added Keyboard "Move with Grid" Functionality

When you press CTRL+ARROW in Access 2000 while in a design surface, the selected object moves without snapping to grid, regardless of the Snap to Grid setting available on the Format menu. Access 2002 has changed the way objects move when you use the arrow keys.

In Access 2002, pressing just the arrow keys moves an object. Whether the object moves with or without the grid depends on the Snap to Grid setting. Pressing the arrow keys in conjunction with the CTRL key moves the object using the opposite of the Snap to Grid setting. The following table shows the behavior in Access 2002 when you use the arrow keys depending on the Snap to Grid setting.

Collapse this tableExpand this table

Snap To Grid On Snap To Grid Off
Arrow Keys Move with grid Move without grid
CTRL+Arrow Keys Move without grid Move with grid

Fixed Control Outlining on Microsoft Windows 9x

On Windows 9x computers, moving controls against normal gray backgrounds is very difficult because the control outlines are almost the same color gray as the standard form background. Access 2002 has added logic to ensure that control outlines are a contrasting color, making them visible all the time.

Support for Find/Replace with Null and Zero-Length Strings

Finding the values Null, Is Null, or "" (zero-length string) previously only worked if the Look In field was set to a specific field in the table being searched and the Match field was set to Whole Field, which are not default settings.

In Access 2002 Null, Is Null, or "" (zero-length string) work the same, regardless of whether you have chosen to Match Case, Search Fields as Formatted, or Look In the whole table. Additionally, this works in an ADP or an MDB.

Also in earlier versions of Access, after you find a null or a zero-length string, you cannot replace it with a value. This situation works like any other replace in Access 2002.

Find What Field in Find/Replace Dialog Box Fills with Highlighted Text

In the Visual Basic Editor, Word, and other Office XP applications, when you select some text and then open the Find/Replace dialog box, the application in question fills the Find What field with the value selected. Access 2002 behaves in the same fashion to be consistent with the rest of Office XP. This behavior is missing in earlier versions of Access. Access only treats text selection, not entire cell selection, as selected items, and truncates any selection greater than 255 characters. If you have a space selected, Access searches for a space, not null values or zero-length strings.

Prior to Access 2002, Access shows the text that was previously searched for in the Find What field. Access 2002 continues to do this, unless you have selected some text. In this case, Access replaces the text last searched for with the selected text. This provides the same functionality as Office XP applications like Word. If Access replaces the last text searched for with the selected text, the last text searched for is moved to the history list available in the Find What drop-down box.

See the original post:
Description of new features and enhancements in Access 2002

Combat Flight Simulator: Cannot Enable Auto Rudder Feature

When you play Microsoft Combat Flight Simulator, the Auto
Rudder feature may not work and the Enable Auto Rudder check box on the Settings screen may not be available.

Combat Flight Simulator 3

To resolve this issue in Combat Flight Simulator 3, delete the
Uisel.xml file, and then allow the game to rebuild the file with default
settings:

  1. Double-click My Computer, and then double-click the drive C.
  2. Double-click the Documents and Settings folder.
  3. Double-click the folder for your user name.
  4. Double-click the Application Data folder.
  5. Double-click the Microsoft folder, and then double-click the folder for Combat Flight Simulator 3.0.
  6. Locate the file Uisel.xml, right-click the file, and then click rename.

    NOTE: By default, the file is located at:
    systemroot :D ocuments and
    SettingsusernameApplication DataMicrosoftCombat
    Flight Simulator 3.0.

  7. Rename the file as Olduisel.xml, and
    then close all folders.
  8. Restart the game to rebuild the file with default
    settings.

Previous Versions

To resolve this issue, verify that the assignment for the rudder
is correct. To do this, follow the appropriate steps for you version of Combat
Flight Simulator.

Combat Flight Simulator

  1. On the Options menu, click Custom Controls.
  2. Click the Assignments tab.
  3. Under the Game Device column, click to select the line for Rudder Axis, and then click Assign.

    NOTE: When you click Assign, the blue line in the Game
    Device
    column becomes a white box, and you have five seconds to assign
    the selected action to a game controller command.

  4. On the game controller, step on the rudder pedal, press the
    button, or move the axis you want to use for the selected action. If you
    receive a warning message that a different action is already assigned to the
    game controller button or axis, click OK.

Combat Flight Simulator 2

  1. On the Combat Flight Simulator 2 startup screen, click Settings.
  2. Click Controller Assignments.
  3. Click Joystick Axes tab.
  4. In the Axes column, click to select the line for Rudder Axis, and then click Change Assignments.
  5. On the game controller, step on the rudder pedal, press the
    button, or move the axis that you want to use for the selected action, and then
    click OK.
  6. Click OK.

If the issue continues to occur, reset the default
configuration for your game controller. To do this, repeat steps 1 through 3
for either game, click any command under the Game Device column, and then click Reset Defaults.

If the issue continues to occur, rebuild the
Combatfs.cfg or Cfs2.cfg file. To do this, press CTRL+SHIFT when you start Combat Flight Simulator or Combat Flight Simulator
2.

After you rebuild the Combatfs.cfg or the Cfs2.cfg file,
you may have to reset any custom settings for your game controller.
Note This is a “FAST PUBLISH” article created directly from within the Microsoft support organization. The information contained herein is provided as-is in response to emerging issues. As a result of the speed in making it available, the materials may include typographical errors and may be revised at any time without notice. See Terms of Use

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151500)

for other considerations.

Article ID: 197304 – Last Review: October 24, 2013 – Revision: 1.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Combat Flight Simulator: WWII Europe Series
  • Microsoft Combat Flight Simulator 2: WWII Pacific Theater
  • Microsoft Combat Flight Simulator 3: Battle for Europe
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbenv kbprb kbui KB197304

Original post:
Combat Flight Simulator: Cannot Enable Auto Rudder Feature

Silent design changes may be discarded in a multiuser environment in Access 2002

Silent design changes (minor design changes) that are made to Microsoft Access-specific objects, such as forms, reports, macros, modules, or commandbars, may be discarded without warning.
The database has been opened by multiple users, and Microsoft Access cannot obtain an exclusive lock on the database.
This behavior is by design. In order to save design changes to any Access-specific objects (forms, reports, macros, modules, PivotTable lists or charts, and commandbars), Access must be able to obtain an exclusive lock on the database. If the database is currently in use by multiple users, Access cannot obtain an exclusive lock and cannot save the design change.
For additional information about Microsoft Access requiring exclusive locks for saving design changes, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

283228

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/283228/EN-US/
)

ACC2002: Exclusive Lock Required for Saving Design Changes to Access Objects

Because all design changes require an exclusive lock in order to be saved, Microsoft Access may not warn you if the design change cannot be saved at the current time. If Access considers the design change to be a “major” change, such as modifying the design of a form, then you are warned if the design change cannot be saved at the current time because it cannot obtain an exclusive lock. However, if Access considers the design change to be a “minor” change, such as applying a filter to a form, then it silently discards the design change if it cannot obtain an exclusive lock. These two categories of design changes are known as “Major Edits” and “Minor Edits.”

Major Edits

Major edits are design changes that Access must be able to save, or that it must warn the user about if the change cannot be saved until Access can obtain an exclusive lock on the database. This prevents the Access developer from losing design changes without any warning. The following is a list of design changes that Access considers to be major edits:

  • Modifying any Microsoft Access-specific object in Design view
  • Modifying the property sheet of forms open in Form view
  • Performing a Save As operation to create a new object from an existing object
  • Adding or removing references in the Visual Basic Environment
  • Changing project properties in the Visual Basic Environment
  • Creating or deleting custom commandbars
  • Modifying the control set of custom commandbars
  • Renaming, deleting, cutting, or pasting an object in the database window
  • Creating, modifying, or deleting custom groups in the database window
  • Creating, modifying, or deleting links to data access pages in the Database window
  • Modifying Pivot Tables and Pivot Charts in design view

Minor Edits

Minor edits are design changes that are silent in nature, and that are discarded if Access cannot obtain an exclusive lock on the database. This prevents users from receiving a warning that their design change cannot be saved when they make a minor modification. The following is a list of design changes that Access considers to be minor edits:

  • Applying a filter to a form, pivot table or chart
  • Applying a quick sort (A-Z, Z-A buttons) to a form
  • Changing printer settings for a form or report
  • Changing any formatting attributes of a form in Datasheet view (column width, row height, font name, color, freezing/unfreezing columns, etc.)
  • Changing the visibility or location of custom commandbars
  • Changing the source of an unbound OLE object frame in Form view
  • Changing the layout of the Database window (large icon, small icon, list, or detail view)

The following are two exceptions when Access does not discard minor edits when it is unable to obtain an exclusive lock:

  • There are other unsaved major edits pending.
  • You make an explicit attempt to save the object, either by clicking the Save command on the File menu or the Save button on the toolbar.

In both cases, Access treats the minor edit as a major edit. For example, if you apply a filter to a form in a database that is opened by multiple users, and then explicitly try to save the form, Access treats the save as a major edit and warns you that the object cannot be saved now because an exclusive lock could not be obtained.

Steps to Reproduce the Behavior

CAUTION: If you follow the steps in this example, you modify the sample database Northwind.mdb. You may want to back up the Northwind.mdb file and follow these steps on a copy of the database.

  1. Start Microsoft Access.
  2. Open the sample database Northwind.mdb.
  3. Open the Customers form in Form view.
  4. On the Records menu, point to Filter, and then click Filter By Form.
  5. In the CustomerID field, type:

    LIKE “a*”

  6. On the Filter menu, click Apply Filter/Sort. Note that the form is correctly filtered to show only records where the CustomerID begins with the letter “a”.
  7. Close the form. You do not receive a confirmation to save the form.
  8. Open the form in Design view.
  9. On the View menu, click Properties to view the properties of the form. Note that the Filter property of the form is set to the following:

    (((Customers.CustomerID) Like “a*”))

    This indicates that the Filter property of the form was saved silently after you applied the filter and closed the form.

  10. Clear the Filter property of the form.
  11. Close and save the form.
  12. Start another instance of Microsoft Access.
  13. Open the sample database Northwind.mdb in the second instance of Microsoft Access.
  14. Using the first instance of Microsoft Access, repeat steps 3 through 9.

When you view the Filter property of the form in Design view, note that it is blank. This indicates that Microsoft Access silently discarded the design change because Access could not obtain an exclusive lock on the database.

Note This is a “FAST PUBLISH” article created directly from within the Microsoft support organization. The information contained herein is provided as-is in response to emerging issues. As a result of the speed in making it available, the materials may include typographical errors and may be revised at any time without notice. See Terms of Use

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151500)

for other considerations.

Article ID: 285828 – Last Review: October 24, 2013 – Revision: 1.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Access 2002 Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbprb KB285828

Taken from:
Silent design changes may be discarded in a multiuser environment in Access 2002

How to get the current QPS

This article explains how to obtain the current QPS.

The current QPS can be retrieved from the following URL under the category “Current QPS”:

http://QRServerHost:QRServerPort/configuration

Note This is a “FAST PUBLISH” article created directly from within the Microsoft support organization. The information contained herein is provided as-is in response to emerging issues. As a result of the speed in making it available, the materials may include typographical errors and may be revised at any time without notice. See Terms of Use

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151500)

for other considerations.

Article ID: 2017461 – Last Review: October 24, 2013 – Revision: 2.0


Applies to
  • FAST ESP
  • FAST Datasearch
  • FAST Instream 4
  • FAST Instream 5
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbrapidpub kbnomt KB2017461

More:
How to get the current QPS

Restarting Admo 2.2.x

This article describes the correct Admomentum 2.2.x restart process.

While the Admomentum Core can be restarted independently of other components, some, such as the JMS server, are tightly central to the Admo functionality and require restarts that are sequenced with other components. The following model shows the order
of necessity for Admo component restarts. Note the position of the Core in this list. Executions outside of this model will lead to further errors and make troubleshooting more difficult.

Start:

  • Database (MySQL, Oracle)
  • InStream/ESP (nctrl start)
  • JMS (Sun JMS, JBoss Messaging, Oracle Messaging)
  • Publisher/geo broker
  • Payment broker
  • Core/openCms Application Server

Stop:

  • Core/openCms Application Server
  • Payment broker
  • Publisher/geo broker
  • JMS (Sun JMS, JBoss Messaging, Oracle Messaging)
  • InStream/ESP (nctrl stop)
  • Database (MySQL, Oracle)
Note This is a “FAST PUBLISH” article created directly from within the Microsoft support organization. The information contained herein is provided as-is in response to emerging issues. As a result of the speed in making it available, the materials may include typographical errors and may be revised at any time without notice. See Terms of Use

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151500)

for other considerations.

Article ID: 2018040 – Last Review: October 24, 2013 – Revision: 2.0

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Restarting Admo 2.2.x

Combat Flight Simulator: Description of the Auto-Rudder Feature

This article describes the functionality of the Auto-Rudder
feature in Combat Flight Simulator.

Because the functionality of the
Auto-Rudder feature in Combat Flight Simulator was improved after the Combat
Flight Simulator Pilot’s Manual went to press, the description of the
Auto-Rudder feature on pages 30 and 33-34 in the Combat Flight Simulator
Pilot’s Manual is no longer accurate.

Using the Auto-Rudder

Combat Flight Simulator 3.0

By default, auto-rudder is turned off. This adds realism to your
flights: you can control the rudder through rudder pedals, a joystick, or the
keyboard. When auto-rudder is turned on, the rudder moves automatically to
maintain coordinated flight in turns, making your airplane easier to
fly.

To turn auto-rudder on or off:

  1. On the main screen, click Options.
  2. In the Realism Options dialog box, select or clear the Enable auto-rudder check box.

Previous Versions

The Auto-Rudder feature in Combat Flight Simulator and in Combat
Flight Simulator 2 is designed to make your airplane easier to fly if your
joystick does not have a rudder axis or rudder pedals. When the Auto-Rudder
feature is enabled, it moves the rudder automatically when you move the
ailerons.

Combat Flight Simulator and Combat Flight Simulator 2
automatically detect if your joystick has a rudder axis or rudder pedals. If
your joystick has a rudder axis or rudder pedals, the game disables the
Auto-Rudder feature. If your joystick does not have a rudder axis or rudder
pedals, the game enables the Auto-Rudder feature.

Some air combat
maneuvers may be easier to execute if you disable the Auto-Rudder feature. To
enable or disable the Auto-Rudder feature:

  1. On the Combat Flight Simulator startup screen, click Settings.
  2. Under Controls, click to select or clear the Enable
    Auto-Rudder
    check box, and then click OK.
Note This is a “FAST PUBLISH” article created directly from within the Microsoft support organization. The information contained herein is provided as-is in response to emerging issues. As a result of the speed in making it available, the materials may include typographical errors and may be revised at any time without notice. See Terms of Use

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151500)

for other considerations.

Article ID: 194816 – Last Review: October 24, 2013 – Revision: 1.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Combat Flight Simulator: WWII Europe Series
  • Microsoft Combat Flight Simulator 2: WWII Pacific Theater
  • Microsoft Combat Flight Simulator 3: Battle for Europe
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Combat Flight Simulator: Description of the Auto-Rudder Feature

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