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Can’t manage the list of users who can submit in-policy meeting requests for resource mailboxes in an Exchange 2010-based hybrid deployment

Assume that you have a hybrid deployment of on-premises Exchange Server 2010 and Exchange Online in Office 365. You discover that you can’t use the Exchange Management Console in Exchange 2010 to manage the list of users who can submit in-policy meeting requests to resource mailboxes in Exchange Online. 

For example, when you try to add users to the list of users who can book meeting requests (the BookInPolicy parameter) for a room mailbox, you receive the following error message:

The property has an incorrect type: System String. It should be type: Microsoft.Exchange.Data.Directory.ADObjectId.

This behavior is by design. 

Method 1: Use Exchange Online PowerShell

To use Exchange Online PowerShell to add users to the list of users who can automatically book a room mailbox, follow these steps: 

  1. Connect to Exchange Online by using remote PowerShell. For more info about how to do this, see Connect to Exchange Online using remote PowerShell

    (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj984289(v=exchg.150).aspx)

    .

  2. Run the following commands:
    $room = Get-CalendarProcessing "Room Name" $room.BookInPolicy += "UserB", "UserC"

    Set-CalendarProcessing room -BookInPolicy $room.BookInPolicy

    Note In this example, UserB and UserC are added to the list.

Method 2: Use the Exchange admin center in Exchange Online

To use the Exchange admin center to add users to the list of users who can automatically book a room mailbox, follow these steps:

  1. Sign in Office 365, and then go to the Exchange admin center.
  2. Give the admin account full access to the resource mailbox.
  3. Sign in to Outlook Web App by using the admin account, and then follow these steps:
    1. In the upper-right are of the Outlook Web App screen, click your name, and then in the drop-down list, click Open another mailbox.
    2. Type the email address of the resource mailbox, and then click Open
    3. In the upper-right corner of the page, click Settings (

      Collapse this imageExpand this image

      ), and then click Options.

    4. In the left navigation pane, click settings, click resource, and then under These users can schedule automatically if the resource is available and can submit a request for owner approval if the resource is unavailable, click Select users and groups. Then, add the users who you want.
Still need help? Go to the Office 365 Community

(http://community.office365.com/)

website or the Exchange TechNet Forums

(http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/exchange/en-us/home?category=exchange2010%2Cexchangeserver)

.

Article ID: 3010295 – Last Review: October 22, 2014 – Revision: 3.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange Online
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 3
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Enterprise
o365022013 o365 o365a o365e o365m hybrid kbgraphxlink kbgraphic kbbug kbnofix KB3010295

Read more here:
Can’t manage the list of users who can submit in-policy meeting requests for resource mailboxes in an Exchange 2010-based hybrid deployment

Emergency message purge and transport rule processing in Office 365 dedicated

In Microsoft Office 365 dedicated, a user may experience one of the following issues:
  • Many problems occur with mail queuing or performance. 
  • An email message that includes incorrect or sensitive content is sent to multiple mailboxes.
The first issue may occur if many email messages or very large email messages are sent to multiple users. This may be related to a denial of service attack.

The second issue may occur if an employee or outside sender sends an email message that is considered inappropriate or that contains sensitive or confidential information.

To resolve these issues, Microsoft can take the following actions:
  • Emergency transport rule
    • Removes instances of an email message from transport queues. 
    • Keeps new instances of an email message from being delivered to users.
  • Emergency message purge
    • Removes instances of an email message from mailboxes.

In some scenarios, it may be appropriate to request both an emergency transport rule and an emergency message purge. The following are three  common scenarios.

Scenario 1

A user reports that an email message that includes an attachment was incorrectly sent to a distribution group that has thousands of members. The attachment contains salary information for several hundred users. This issue occurred 30 minutes earlier, and the sender of the email message engaged his or her service desk to request that the email message be removed from the recipients’ mailboxes.

Scenario 1: Resolution

To resolve the issue in this scenario, a MOSSUP-recognized authorized requester from your organization must contact Microsoft to request an emergency message purge. To do this, please use the Exchange Online topic and the Message Purge subtopic when you submit a support incident online

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2694621 /
)

to Microsoft Online Services Support, or contact Microsoft Online Services Support by telephone

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2573289/
)

. In addition, please provide as much information about the email message as possible. The information should include the sender, the recipients, the subject, the day or time that the email message was sent, and the fact that the email message contains an attachment.

Scenario 2

Users report that they are receiving many copies of an email message from an external sender. Some users reply all and forward the email message. There are some reports of internal messages taking a long time to be received.

Scenario 2: Resolution

To resolve the issue in this scenario, a MOSSUP-recognized authorized requester from your organization must contact Microsoft to request an emergency message purge and an emergency transport rule. To do this, please use the Exchange Online topic and the Message Purge subtopic when you submit a support incident online

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2694621 /
)

 to Microsoft Online Services Support, or contact Microsoft Online Services Support by telephone

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2573289/
)

. In addition, please provide as much information about the email message as possible. The information should include the sender, the recipients, the subject, the day or time that the email message was sent, and the evidence that is available to indicate that other email messages are delayed. This lets us determine whether an emergency transport rule is necessary.

Scenario 3

An internal process generated many email messages, and all mail delivery is delayed.

Scenario 3: Resolution

To resolve the issue in this scenario, a MOSSUP-recognized authorized requester from your organization must contact Microsoft to request an emergency transport rule to delete these email messages. To do this, please use the Exchange Online topic and the Message Purge subtopic when you submit a support incident online

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2694621 /
)

 to Microsoft Online Services Support, or contact Microsoft Online Services Support by telephone

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2573289/
)

. In addition, please provide as much information about the email message as possible. The information should include the sender, the recipients, the subject, the day or time that the email message that was sent, and the evidence that is available to indicate that other email messages are delayed.

Emergency transport rule

If it is necessary, an emergency transport rule will be created based on the characteristics that are provided, and corresponding email messages will be deleted.

Emergency message purge

The emergency message purge process removes email messages from a user’s mailbox based on specific characteristics. These characteristics can include sender, day or time that the message was sent, subject line, and whether there is an attachment. The emergency message purge searches for email messages that match the criteria and then removes these email messages from the mailbox. The email messages in the Recoverable Items folder of the mailbox are also removed. However, the email message is not removed from the Purges folder. This means that the purged item can be recovered individually by an administrator. However, the purged item is not recoverable from Microsoft Outlook and cannot be recovered in a bulk process.

For more information about deleted-item retention and recovery, go to the following Microsoft TechNet website:

An emergency message purge can be completed by Microsoft O365 Dedicated Support. The process involves multiple steps to make sure that the correct content is removed from users’ mailboxes. This process is optimized to make sure that the correct information is removed in as timely a manner as possible. 

Limitations and risks

  • Only messages that exist in the customer’s managed email environment can be purged.

    Notes 

    • Email messages that are sent outside the environment cannot be removed by Microsoft in this process. This includes public email services such as Hotmail and other private email servers.
    • If you are using a language that contains double-byte characters (for example, Korean is a language that uses double-byte characters), MOSSUP cannot complete the purge request. However, the customer can perform the message purge by using Windows PowerShell cmdlets in self-service tools. 

  • Email messages that are saved to .pst files or to a local drive cannot be purged by Microsoft in this process.
  • Depending on the number of mailboxes that must be searched, the time to complete this request can vary.
  • Email messages are deleted based on their subject, and this process searches for a complete string of words in the subject line. For example, a purge run against the subject “Welcome to the company” will also delete email messages such as “Welcome to the company Bob” or “I felt welcome to the company.” Preparation work has to be done before the actual purge to make sure that the correct email messages and recipients are targeted.
  • Forward and reply messages in an email thread cannot be specifically targeted. The message purge must be run against the subject that does not have the “FW:” or “RE:” prefixes. If a valid message is to be excluded from the purge, the Sent time stamp must be used to omit the valid message.

    For example, a valid message that has the subject “Company Wide Announcement for January” is sent at 3:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST). One recipient replies to all the recipients of this message at 3:15 EST and creates a message that has the subject “RE: Company Wide Announcement for January.” This reply contains sensitive information that should be purged. However, the initial email message should not be targeted. To perform this purge, the subject “Company Wide Announcement for January” is used with a Sent time stamp of 3:14 PM EST. All the messages in the thread that are sent after 3:14 PM EST will be purged.

  • Any email message that is deleted from a mailbox that has Single Item Retention (SIR) disabled cannot be recovered by Microsoft. Because there is a risk that messages will be unintentionally deleted from mailboxes that have SIR disabled, Microsoft will enable SIR on any mailboxes that are found. If mailboxes that have SIR disabled are found, the purge process will be delayed for these mailboxes until SIR is enabled. It will take 60 minutes to make sure that these mailboxes are enabled.
  • By design, messages from Proofpoint archives cannot be deleted. Therefore, requests for the deletion of these messages will not be processed.

General process narrative

Customers should be aware that they have to work closely with O365 Dedicated Support throughout the following process:

  1. A MOSSUP-recognized authorized requester must submit a support incident. 

    Note If you are unsure whether the requester is a member of the list of MOSSUP-recognized authorized requesters, contact your service delivery manager (SDM). 

    The support incident provides O365 Dedicated Support with the characteristics that are needed to identify the target email message. These include the sender, the subject line, and the date or time that the email message that was sent. If a customer other than the MOSSUP-recognized authorized requester should work with O365 Dedicated Support, this should be specified in the support incident. If the customer knows from which recipients’ mailboxes they want the email message purged, they should include a list of recipients in the support incident.

  2. If the case is a Severity A escalation, customers must call O365 Dedicated Support after they submit the support incident.
  3. The O365 Dedicated Support agent will work to obtain a complete list of the recipients if the customer did not provide this or if the customer is not sure of who should be included in the list of recipients. The agent will do this by searching the message-tracking logs for the message in question and exporting all recipients. This lets the purge process be run against as few mailboxes as possible. Message tracking expedites the process and avoids unexpected consequences. However, message-tracking logs are maintained for only ten days. If the email message was sent more than ten days earlier, the requester must provide a list of recipients.

    Note An environment-wide purge can be run against all mailboxes. Depending on the number of mailboxes in the environment and the size of the mailboxes, this process can take up to 48 hours. Such a purge should be done only in situations in which O365 Dedicated Support and the customer requester agree that this is the method of choice. 

  4. The O365 Dedicated Support agent will engage the MOSSUP-recognized authorized requester (or the customer contact who is specified by the MOSSUP-recognized authorized requester) to confirm the recipient list before the agent goes to the next step.
  5. A pre-purge process is run against the recipient list or all mailboxes. During this process, a search is run against the mailboxes to identify the email message that fits the criteria of the target email message. O365 Dedicated Support will provide the requester with a spreadsheet that includes a list of the users and the number of messages that were found that meet the criteria of the target email message. However, there may be a strong business reason to skip this part of the process. If this is the case, skipping the pre-purge search process should be approved by the MOSSUP-recognized authorized requester. Even if the pre-purge search process is skipped, a check should nevertheless be made to make sure that the SIR feature is enabled for all recipients and all mailboxes. If the SIR feature is not enabled, the support agent will enable the SIR feature. This feature makes sure that messages can be recovered for a specific mailbox from the mailbox Purges folder. 

    For more information about the SIR feature, go to the following Microsoft TechNet website: 

    It will take an hour to confirm that the SIR feature is set on the mailbox. The process can continue for the mailboxes that are found to have the SIR feature enabled. The purge can then be run against the remaining mailboxes. If there is a strong business reason to continue the purge process on all mailboxes immediately, the customer contact should communicate this to the O365 Dedicated Support agent.

    After the pre-purge process is complete and the customer reviews the spreadsheet, the MOSSUP-recognized authorized requester must provide approval to O365 Dedicated Support through an email message. Then, the purge will continue.

  6. When O365 Dedicated Support receives the approval, the purge will be run, and a spreadsheet that contains the recipients and the number of email messages that were found will be sent to the customer. 

Note For more information about self-service options to control data spillage, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

2811786

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2811786/
)

How to control data spillage in Office 365 dedicated and ITAR

Article ID: 2736413 – Last Review: October 22, 2014 – Revision: 11.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Business Productivity Online Dedicated
  • Microsoft Business Productivity Online Suite Federal

Taken from:
Emergency message purge and transport rule processing in Office 365 dedicated

Unable to manage the list of users who can submit in-policy meeting requests for resource mailboxes in an Exchange 2010-based hybrid deployment

Assume that you have a hybrid deployment of on-premises Exchange Server 2010 and Exchange Online in Office 365. You find that you’re unable to use the Exchange Management Console in Exchange 2010 to manage the list of users who can submit in-policy meeting requests to resource mailboxes in Exchange Online. 

For example, when you try to add users to the list of users who can book meeting requests (the BookInPolicy parameter) for a room mailbox, you get the following error message:

The property has an incorrect type: System String. It should be type: Microsoft.Exchange.Data.Directory.ADObjectId.

This behavior is by design. 

Method 1: Use Exchange Online PowerShell

To use Exchange Online PowerShell to add users to the list of users who can automatically book a room mailbox, follow these steps: 

  1. Connect to Exchange Online by using remote PowerShell. For more info about how to do this, see Connect to Exchange Online using remote PowerShell

    (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj984289(v=exchg.150).aspx)

    .

  2. Run the following commands:
    $room = Get-CalendarProcessing "Room Name" $room.BookInPolicy += "UserB", "UserC"

    Set-CalendarProcessing room -BookInPolicy $room.BookInPolicy

    Note In this example, UserB and UserC are added to the list.

Method 2: Use the Exchange admin center in Exchange Online

To use the Exchange admin center to add users to the list of users who can automatically book a room mailbox, follow these steps:

  1. Sign in Office 365, and then go to the Exchange admin center.
  2. Give the admin account full access to the resource mailbox.
  3. Sign in to Outlook Web App by using the admin account, and then follow these steps:
    1. In the upper-right are of the Outlook Web App screen, click your name, and then in the drop-down list, click Open another mailbox.
    2. Type the email address of the resource mailbox, and then click Open
    3. In the upper-right corner of the page, click Settings (

      Collapse this imageExpand this image

      ), and then click Options.

    4. In the left navigation pane, click settings, click resource, and then under These users can schedule automatically if the resource is available and can submit a request for owner approval if the resource is unavailable, click Select users and groups, and then add the users who you want.
Still need help? Go to the Office 365 Community

(http://community.office365.com/)

website or the Exchange TechNet Forums

(http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/exchange/en-us/home?category=exchange2010%2Cexchangeserver)

.

Article ID: 3010295 – Last Review: October 22, 2014 – Revision: 1.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange Online
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 3
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Enterprise
o365022013 o365 o365a o365e o365m hybrid kbgraphxlink kbgraphic kbbug kbnofix KB3010295

View the original here:
Unable to manage the list of users who can submit in-policy meeting requests for resource mailboxes in an Exchange 2010-based hybrid deployment

Office 365 DNS Diagnostics and DNS configuration

This article is listed on Office 365 DNS diagnostic tool.

To use your own domain name with Office 365 will need up to 10 DNS records manually configured third-party Domain Registrar Web site.
Misconfiguration of the DNS is one of the top queries received from customers of the Office 365 days a year. May cause problems if DNS record is missing or incorrectly configured in Outlook and mail flow connectivity, Lync sign-in, or external Instant Messaging (IM) provider Federation.

Office 365 DNS Diagnostics detects all the DNS records required for Office 365 services, identifies the known configuration mistakes.

When you use the Office 365 DNS diagnostic

DNS configuration errors is a primary cause of the problem that is described in this section. Strongly recommended to run Office 365 DNS diagnostic to identify these problems.

Exchange Online problems

  • Mail delivery problems
    • Cannot receive mail on the Internet
    • To receive a non-delivery report (NDR)
  • Outlook client connectivity problems
    • Outlook and Exchange Online connection issues
    • Autodiscover does not work

Lync Online of the problem

  • Lync client sign-in problems
  • IM does not work between the contacts are federated or public IM connectivity partners (PIC)
  • IM from Outlook Web App or presence issues
SharePoint Online the issue
  • Access to the published Web site to use the domain name

How to use the Office 365 DNS diagnostic

Office 365 DNS Diagnostic can be run on Internet-accessible computers. Office 365 DNS diagnostic tool using Nslookup.exe queries and DNS records of Office 365 days a year from the computer’s default DNS servers, detects a DNS misconfiguration. However, does not collect data specific to the computer that is running the tool.

  1. Office 365 DNS diagnostic O365 Customer Domain Name page, type the domain name. Office 365 DNS diagnostic tool verify DNS records for the domain.

    Collapse this imageExpand this image

    Note domain Office 365 portal (http://portal.microsoftonline.com

    (http://portal.microsoftonline.com/)

    ) To verify that have been approved and added. If you have not yet approved the domain will access to the following Microsoft Web site.

  2. Select the scenario that applies in the Exchange Deployment Scenario page. Cloud Only or Co-exist/Hybrid is optional.

    Scenario if there is more than one domain, select the domain you entered in step 1 applies.

    • If you have moved to Office 365 [Cloud Onlychoose all the mailboxes to the appropriate domain.
    • Select the Cloud Only If you don’t use the domain to the appropriate Exchange Online mailbox.
    • Select the Co-exist/Hybrid If divided into on-premises Exchange Server environment and Exchange Online mailboxes are hosted.
For more information, visit to the following Microsoft Web site.
If you need additional information Office 365 community

(http://community.office365.com/ja-jp/default.aspx)

Please see the Web site.

Article ID: 2776497 – Last Review: October 21, 2014 – Revision: 17.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Lync Online
  • Microsoft Exchange Online
  • Microsoft SharePoint Online
o365 o365a o365p o365e o365022013 o365m kbgraphic kbmt KB2776497 KbMten

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Office 365 DNS Diagnostics and DNS configuration

Shared mailboxes moved from on-premises environments to Office 365 are converted to user mailboxes after directory synchronization

Assume that you have a hybrid deployment of Microsoft Exchange Online in Microsoft Office 365 and in your on-premises Microsoft Exchange Server environment. After directory synchronization runs, shared mailboxes that were moved from the on-premises environment to Office 365 are unexpectedly converted to regular mailboxes. When this occurs, you may be unable to convert the mailboxes to shared mailboxes. If you can make this conversion, the mailboxes revert to shared mailboxes the next time that directory synchronization runs.

Also, when you view the properties of the shared mailboxes in the Office 365 portal, you may receive the following error message:

Exchange: Couldn’t convert the mailbox because the mailbox is already of the type ‘Regular’

This issue occurs if the value of the msExchRemoteRecipientType attribute isn’t set correctly by the on-premises hybrid server that’s running Microsoft Exchange Server 2010. The value of the msExchRemoteRecipientType attribute is incorrectly set to 0×4. A value of 0×4 indicates that the mailbox was migrated. In this situation, directory synchronization replicates the attribute to the cloud, and then Office 365 converts the shared mailbox to a MailUser object.

The value of the msExchRemoteRecipientType attribute should be set to 0×64. The hexadecimal value of 0×64 is equal to a decimal value of 100. In this situation, the shared mailbox isn’t converted to a regular mailbox when directory synchronization runs. Instead, it remains as a shared mailbox. 

To work around this issue, use the Exchange Management Shell to change the value of the msExchRemoteRecipientType attribute. 

Change the value of the msExchRemoteRecipientType attribute for one user

To change the value for one user, follow these steps:

  1. Run the Exchange Management Shell as an admin.
  2. At the command prompt, type the following command, and then press Enter:
    Set-Mailbox –identity user@contoso.com –RemoteRecipientType “ProvisionMailbox, ProvisionArchive”

Note The ProvisionMailbox and ProvisionArchive flags set the msExchRemoteRecipientType attribute to the correct decimal value for the version of Exchange on which the Exchange Management Shell commands are running.

Change the value of the msExchRemoteRecipientType attribute for all users

To change the value this for all users, follow these steps:

  1. Run the Exchange Management Shell as an admin.
  2. At the command prompt, type the following commands, and then press Enter:
    $mbx = Get-Mailbox -ResultSize Unlimited -Filter (RecipientTypeDetails -eq "UserMailbox") -and (RemoteRecipientType -eq "Migrated")
    $mbx | Set-Mailbox -RemoteRecipientType "ProvisionMailbox, ProvisionArchive"

Note The ProvisionMailbox and ProvisionArchive flags set the msExchRemoteRecipientType attribute to the correct decimal value for the version of Exchange on which the Exchange Management Shell commands are running.

This is a known issue. Microsoft is currently investigating the issue and will post more information in this article when it becomes available.
Still need help? Go to the Office 365 Community

(http://community.office365.com/)

website or the Exchange TechNet Forums

(http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/exchange/en-us/home?category=exchange2010%2Cexchangeserver)

.

Article ID: 2710029 – Last Review: October 17, 2014 – Revision: 13.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange Online
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Enterprise
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Standard
o365 o365022013 o365e o365m o365a hybrid kbbug KB2710029

View article:
Shared mailboxes moved from on-premises environments to Office 365 are converted to user mailboxes after directory synchronization

Internet accessible URLs required for connectivity to Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online

You cannot access Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011, Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2013, or specific URLs fail to load when you use Microsoft Dynamics CRM. When you try to configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook, you receive the following error: 

The server address (URL) is not valid

In addition, a network error message is seen if you monitor network traffic or web request and will be logged as an HTTP 502 error. 

Proxy and/or Firewall configuration may be configured to prevent Microsoft Dynamics CRM URLs from accessing server resources.
For a list of Required Accessible IP Address Ranges see this article 2728473

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2728473)

To view the Required URLs for Microsoft Dynamics CRM with Office 365, see the link below:

Office 365 URLs and IP address ranges

(http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh373144.aspx)

Article ID: 2655102 – Last Review: October 17, 2014 – Revision: 17.0


Applies to
  • CRM Online via Office 365 E Plans
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online Professional Edition
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online Professional Plus
kbmbsmigrate kbsurveynew KB2655102

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Internet accessible URLs required for connectivity to Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online

Japanese DBCS characters are corrupted when you reply to or forward a message

Assume that you’re using Microsoft Outlook to either reply to a message or forward a message that’s sent from one of the following environments:
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2013
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 1 (SP1) or Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 2 (SP2)
  • Microsoft Exchange Online in Office 365

In this situation, Japanese double-byte character set (DBCS) characters that appear in any of the following fields of the message become corrupted:

  • The display name of the sender
  • The display name of the recipients
  • The subject of the message
  • The file name of an attachment
  • The message body

This issue occurs if the field contains single-byte Kana characters.

Note This issue also occurs in posted items in public folders.

This issue occurs because the value of the PR_INTERNET_CPID MAPI property of the message is stamped as 50222 by Exchange RPC Client Access service or Outlook Web App. Because of a restriction in Outlook, the code page 50222 characters are corrupted.
To resolve this issue, use one of the following methods, as appropriate for your situation.

In Exchange Server 2013

Collapse this imageExpand this image

Use the Exchange Management Shell to change the value of the PreferredInternetCodePageForShiftJis parameter to 50220. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Open the Exchange Management Shell.
  2. Run the following commands:
    Set-OrganizationConfig -PreferredInternetCodePageForShiftJis:50220
    Get-RemoteDomain | Set-RemoteDomain -PreferredInternetCodePageForShiftJis:50220

Collapse this imageExpand this image

In Exchange Server 2010

Collapse this imageExpand this image

Upgrade to Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 2 (SP2) and then install the following update rollup:

2661854

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2661854/
)

Description of Update Rollup 2 for Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 2

After you install this update rollup, use the Exchange Management Shell to change the value of the PreferredInternetCodePageForShiftJis parameter to 50220. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Open the Exchange Management Shell.
  2. Run the following commands:
    Set-OrganizationConfig -PreferredInternetCodePageForShiftJis:50220

    Get-RemoteDomain | Set-RemoteDomain -PreferredInternetCodePageForShiftJis:50220

Note The PreferredInternetCodePageForShiftJis parameter is available only after you install Update Rollup 2 for Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 2. 

Collapse this imageExpand this image

In Exchange Online

Collapse this imageExpand this image

Use Exchange Online PowerShell to change the value of the PreferredInternetCodePageForShiftJis parameter to 50220. 

  1. Connect to Exchange Online by using PowerShell. For more information about how to do this, see Connect to Exchange Online using remote PowerShell

    (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj984289(v=exchg.150).aspx)

    .

  2. Run the following commands:
    Set-OrganizationConfig -PreferredInternetCodePageForShiftJis:50220
    Get-RemoteDomain | Set-RemoteDomain -PreferredInternetCodePageForShiftJis:50220

Collapse this imageExpand this image

To work around this issue, do not use single-byte Kana characters in the ISO-2022-JP encoded message. For example, use UTF-8 encoded characters in the message instead.

Article ID: 2642153 – Last Review: October 17, 2014 – Revision: 7.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 2, when used with:
    • Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Enterprise
    • Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Standard
  • Microsoft Exchange Online
kbqfe kbfix kbsurveynew kbexpertiseinter o365022013 o365 o365a o365e o365m hybrid KB2642153

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Japanese DBCS characters are corrupted when you reply to or forward a message

Upgrading to Office 2013 or Office 365

If you have an earlier version of Office installed on your PC and you install Office Home and Student 2013, Office Home and Business 2013, Office Professional 2013, or Office 365 Home, you won’t have an option to upgrade over the previous version. Instead, you’ll have both the new version of Office and your earlier version installed on the same PC. If you don’t want both versions, you should uninstall the earlier version through Programs and Features in Control Panel.

If you have problems uninstalling, use the Fix it in these articles to remove Office:

For more information about having multiple versions of Office on the same PC, see Install and use multiple versions of Office on the same PC

(http://office.microsoft.com/redir/HA103981695.aspx)

.

Upgrading between new versions of Office

If you have a preview version of Office on your PC, like Office 365 Home Premium Preview, you must uninstall the preview first before you install a full version like Microsoft Office Home & Student 2013. If you don’t remove the preview, you may get this error:

Microsoft Office 2013 does not support upgrading from a preview version of Microsoft Office 2013

Use the Fix it in the Uninstall Microsoft Office 2013 or Office 365

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2739501/)

article to remove the preview.

If you already have a full version of the new Office product, like Office Home & Student 2013 or Office 365 Home on your PC and you want to switch to another version, contact support

(http://support.microsoft.com/get-support/more?Family=Office)

to learn more about your options.

Article ID: 2808268 – Last Review: October 17, 2014 – Revision: 6.1


Applies to
  • Microsoft Office Home and Business 2013
  • Microsoft Office Home and Student 2013
  • Microsoft Office Professional 2013
  • Microsoft Office 365 Home
  • Microsoft Office 365 ProPlus
  • Microsoft Office 365 for enterprises
  • Microsoft Office 365 for small businesses

More:
Upgrading to Office 2013 or Office 365

How to uninstall Office 2013 or Office 365

To automatically uninstall Microsoft Office 2013 or Office 365, click the Fix it button:

Collapse this imageExpand this image

Fix this problem

(http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=9815935)


Microsoft Fix it

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Important After you click the button, the File Download dialog box appears at the bottom of the Internet Explorer window. To download the Fix it, click Save. If you click Open, you may have problems when you run the Fix it. When the process is complete, click Open folder, locate the file (the file name should start as “O15CTRRemove”), and then double-click the file to run the Fix it.

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If you want to know how to reinstall Office 2013 or Office 365, see How to reinstall Office 2013 or Office 365.

If you can’t uninstall Office 2013 or Office 365 by using the Fix it solution, try the following steps to manually uninstall the program. Or, contact Microsoft Support

(http://support.microsoft.com/contactus/?ws=support)

for help.

Manual steps to uninstall Office 2013 or Office 365

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Step 1: Determine the Office installation type

Before you follow these steps, you must know the installation type of your Office installation. This is important because each installation type may require a different removal method.

To determine the office installation type, follow these steps:

  1. Start an Office application, such as Microsoft Word.
  2. On the File menu, click Account.
  3. If Office 2013 was installed by using Click-to-Run, an Update Options appears. For an MSI installation, the Update Options item does not appear.

Tips

  • Click-to-Run is a new method that you can use to install and update Microsoft Office over the Internet. Click-to-Run operates in a manner that’s similar to streaming video. By default, Office 365 products are installed by using Click-to-Run.
  • MSI is the traditional method that’s used to install Office. Typically, Office is installed from a local installation resource.

(http://bemis/33/_layouts/ArticlePages/determine)


Step 2: Manually uninstall Office 2013 or Office 365

For a Click-to-Run installation of Office 2013, such as for Office 365 Home

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Note To complete this method, you must be logged on to Windows through an administrator account. If this is your personal computer, you’re probably already logged on through an administrator account. If the computer is part of a network, you might have to ask the system administrator for help. To verify that you’re logged on through an administrator account, see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:
Step 1: Remove the remaining Windows Installer packages

  1. Open the Office 15 installation folder. By default, the folder is located at C:Program FilesMicrosoft Office 15.
  2. Open the root folder, open the integration folder, and then delete all C2RManifest*.xml files, such as c2rmanifest.officemui.msi.zip.en-us.
  3. Use one of the following methods to open a Command Prompt window as an administrator.

    For Windows 7

    1. Click Start, click All Programs, and then open the Accessories folder.
    2. Right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator.

    For Windows 8 or Windows 8.1

    1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. If you use a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search.
    2. In the Search box, type CMD. In the search results, press and hold Command Prompt for one second, and then click Run as administrator. If you use a mouse, right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator.
  4. At the command prompt, type the following commands and press Enter after each one:
    cd "C:Program filesMicrosoft Office 15rootintegration"
    integrator.exe /U

Step 2: Remove the Office 2013 scheduled tasks

  1. Open a Command Prompt window as an administrator. 
  2. At the command prompt, type the following commands and press Enter after each one:
    schtasks.exe /delete /tn "MicrosoftOfficeOffice 15 Subscription Heartbeat"
    schtasks.exe /delete /tn "MicrosoftOfficeOffice Automatic Update"
    schtasks.exe /delete /tn "MicrosoftOfficeOffice Subscription Maintenance"

Step 3: Use Task Manager to end the Click-to-Run tasks

  1. Use one of the following methods to open Task Manager.

    For Windows 7

    Right-click an empty area of the taskbar, and then click Start Task Manager.

    For Windows 8 or Windows 8.1

    1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. If you use a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search.
    2. In the Search box, type Task Manager. In the search results, click Task Manager.
  2. Click the Process tab.
  3. If the following processes are running, right-click each one, and then click End Process in Windows 7 or End Task in Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 after you select each process.
    • integratedoffice.exe
    • appvshnotify.exe
    • firstrun.exe
    • setup*.exe

Step 4: Delete the Office 2013 service

  1. Open a Command Prompt window as an administrator.
  2. At the command prompt, type the following command, and then press Enter:

Step 5: Delete the Office 2013 files

  1. Use one of the following methods to open the Run dialog box.

    For Windows 7

    1. Click Start, type Run in the Start Search box, and then click Run in the search results.

    For Windows 8 or Windows 8.1

    1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. If you use a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search.
    2. In the Search box, type Run, and then click Run in the search results.

    Note You can also press the Windows logo key+R to open the Run dialog box.

  2. In the Open box, type %ProgramFiles%, and then click OK.
  3. Delete the “Microsoft Office 15″ folder.
  4. Open the Run dialog box, type %ProgramData%Microsoft, and then click OK.
  5. Delete the ClickToRun folder. If the folder does not exist, go on to the next step.
  6. Open the Run dialog box, type %ProgramData%Microsoftoffice, and then click
    OK.
  7. Delete the FFPackageLocker folder.

Note If you cannot delete a folder or a file that’s open or that’s being used by another program, restart the computer, and then try again. If you still can’t remove the folder, go to the next step.

Step 6: Delete the Office 2013 registry subkeys

Important Follow the steps in this section carefully. Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Before you modify it, back up the registry for restoration

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/322756/
)

in case problems occur.

  1. Open Registry Editor.

    For Windows 7

    1. Click Start, type Run in the Start Search box, and then click Run in the search results.
    2. Type regedit, and then click OK.

    For Windows 8 or Windows 8.1

    1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. If you use a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search.
    2. In the Search box, type regedit, and then click regedit.exe in the search results pane.
  2. Delete the following registry subkeys:
    • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftOffice15.0ClickToRun

    • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftAppVISV

    • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionUninstallMicrosoft Office 15 – en-us

    Note In the subkey in the third bullet item, “Microsoft Office 15 - en-us” represents the actual program name. This name depends on the Office 2013 edition and language version that you installed.

Step 7: Delete the Start menu shortcuts

  1. Open the Run dialog box.
  2. Type %ALLUSERSPROFILE%MicrosoftWindowsStart MenuPrograms, and then press Enter.
  3. Delete the Office 2013 folders.

Step 8: Uninstall the Microsoft Office Habanero local component and Habanero supplemental local component

  1. Open a Command Prompt window as an administrator.
  2. At the command prompt, type one of the following commands, as appropriate to your operating system, and then press Enter:
    • If you’re running an x86 version of Office 2013 on an x64 operating system, run the following command:
      MsiExec.exe /X50150000-008F-0000-1000-0000000FF1CE

    • If you’re running an x86 version of Office 2013 on an x86 operating system, run the following command:
      MsiExec.exe /X50150000-007E-0000-0000-0000000FF1CE

    • If you’re running an x64 version of Office 2013 on an x64 operating system, run the following command:
      MsiExec.exe /X50150000-008C-0000-1000-0000000FF1CE

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For an MSI installation of Office 2013

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Important To uninstall Office 2013, you must be able to view hidden files and folders. To do this, follow these steps before you start this procedure:

  1. Start Windows Explorer.
  2. Press Alt to display the menu bar.
  3. On the Tools menu, click Folder Options.
  4. Click the View tab.
  5. In the Advanced settings pane, click Show hidden files and folders under Hidden files and folders.
  6. Clear the Hide extensions for known file types check box.
  7. Click OK, and then exit windows Explorer.

Step 1: Remove any remaining Windows Installer packages for the Office 2013 system

  1. Use one of the following methods to open the Run dialog box.

    For Windows 7

    1. Click Start, type Run in the Start Search box, and then click Run in the search results.

    For Windows 8 or Windows 8.1

    1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. If you use a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search.
    2. In the Search box, type Run, and then click Run in the search results.
  2. Type installer, and then click OK.

    Note This opens the %windir%Installer folder.

  3. Press Alt to display the menu bar.
  4. For Windows 7
    1. On the View menu, click Choose details.

    For Windows 8 or Windows 8.1

    1. On the View ribbon, click Details in the Layout group.
  5. Select the Subject check box, type 340 in the Width of selected column (in pixels) box, and then click OK.

    Note It may take several minutes for the subjects to appear next to each .msi file.

  6. On the View menu, point to Sort By, and then click Subject.
  7. If a User Account Control dialog box appears, click Allow to continue.
  8. Locate each .msi file that has “Microsoft Office 2013″ as the subject, right-click the .msi file, and then click Uninstall.

    Note In this step, represents the actual name of the Office 2013 product.

Step 2: Stop the Office Source Engine service

  1. Open the Run dialog box.
  2. Type services.msc, and then click OK.
  3. In the Services window, determine whether the Office Source Engine service is running. (If the service is running, “Started” appears in the Status column.) If this service is running, right-click Office Source Engine, and then click Stop.
  4. Close the Services window.

Step 3: Delete any remaining Office 2013 installation folders

  1. Open the Run dialog box.
  2. Type %CommonProgramFiles%Microsoft Shared, and then click OK.

    Note On a computer that’s running a 64-bit version of Windows, type %CommonProgramFiles(x86)%Microsoft Shared, and then click OK.

  3. If the following folders are present, delete them:
  4. Open the Run dialog
    box.
  5. Type %ProgramFiles%Microsoft Office, and then click OK.

    Note On a computer that’s running a 64-bit version of Windows, type %ProgramFiles(x86)%Microsoft Office, and then click OK.

  6. Delete the Office15 folder.
  7. On the root folder of each hard disk drive, locate and then open the MSOCache folder. If you don’t see this folder, follow these steps:
    1. Start Windows Explorer, and then click Folder Options on the Tools menu.
    2. Click the View tab.
    3. In the Advanced settings section, click Show hidden files and folders under Hidden files and folders.
    4. Clear the Hide protected operating system files check box, and then click OK.
    5. Open the All Users folder in the MSOCache folder, and then delete every folder that contains “0FF1CE}- in the folder name.

      Note This text contains “0″ (zero) and “1″ characters for the letters “O” and “I.” For example, delete the folder that is named as follows:

      90150000-001B-0409-0000-0000000FF1CE-C

Step 4: Delete any remaining Office 2013 installation files

  1. Open the Run dialog box.
  2. Type %appdata%microsofttemplates, and then click OK.
  3. Delete the following files:
    • Normal.dotm
    • Welcome to Word.dotx
  4. Open the Run dialog box.
  5. Type %appdata%microsoftdocument building blocks, and then click OK.
  6. Open the subfolder under the “Document Building Blocks” folder.

    Note The subfolder title will be a four-digit number that represents the language of the Microsoft Office suite.

  7. Delete the “Building blocks.dotx” file.
  8. Exit all programs before you follow the rest of the steps.

Step 5: Delete the registry subkeys for the Office 2013 system

Warning Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly by using Registry Editor or by using another method. These problems might require that you reinstall the operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that these problems can be solved. Modify the registry at your own risk.

Important This article contains information about how to modify the registry. Make sure that you back up the registry before you modify it. Make sure that you know how to restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up, restore, and modify the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

322756

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/322756/
)

How to back up and restore the registry in Windows

Locate and then delete the Office 2013 registry subkeys if they are present. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Open the Run dialog box.
  2. Type regedit, and then click OK.
  3. Click the following registry subkey:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftOffice15.0

  4. On the File menu, click Export, type DeletedKey01, and then click Save.
  5. On the Edit menu, click Delete, and then click Yes to confirm.
  6. Repeat steps 1 through 7 for each registry subkey in the following lists. Increment the name of the exported key by one for each subkey.

    For example: Type DeletedKey02 for the second key, type DeletedKey03 for the third key, and so on.

    Note In the following registry keys, the asterisk character (*) represents one or more characters in the subkey name.

32-bit versions of Windows
  • HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftOffice15.0
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftOffice15.0
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftOfficeDeliverySourceEngineDownloads*0FF1CE}-*
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionUninstall*0FF1CE*
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionInstallerUpgrade Codes*F01FEC
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionInstallerUserDataS-1-5-18Products*F01FEC
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetServicesose
  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTInstallerFeatures*F01FEC
  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTInstallerProducts*F01FEC
  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTInstallerUpgradeCodes*F01FEC
  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTInstallerWin32Assemblies*Office15*
64-bit versions of Windows
  • HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftOffice15.0
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREWow6432NodeMicrosoftOffice15.0
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREWow6432NodeMicrosoftOfficeDeliverySourceEngineDownloads*0FF1CE}-*
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREWow6432NodeMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionUninstall*0FF1CE*
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetServicesose
  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTInstallerFeatures*F01FEC
  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTInstallerProducts*F01FEC
  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTInstallerUpgradeCodes*F01FEC
  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTInstallerWin32Asemblies*Office15*

Also delete the following registry subkeys:

  1. Locate one of the following subkeys, depending on the version of Windows that you’re running:
    • 32-bit: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionUninstall
    • 64-bit: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREWow6432NodeMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionUninstall
  2. On the File menu, click Export, type UninstallKey01, and then click Save.
  3. Under the Uninstall subkey that you located in step 1, click each subkey, and then determine whether the subkey has the following value assigned to it:
    • Name: UninstallString
    • Data: file_name pathOffice Setup ControllerSetup.exe path

    Note In this example, file_name represents the actual name of an installation program, and path represents the actual file path.

  4. If the subkey contains the name and the data that are described in step 3, click Delete on the Edit menu. Otherwise, go to step 5.
  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until you locate and delete every subkey that matches the name and data that are described in step 3.
  6. Close Registry Editor.

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Get Live Help


How to reinstall Office 2013 or Office 365

Sign in to your account page

(http://office.microsoft.com/redir/XT102780162.aspx)

, and then click the Install button to reinstall Office on the same computer. If you purchased Office on a DVD, use the DVD and product key that came in the product packaging to reinstall the software.

Article ID: 2739501
Last review: October 17, 2014
Applies to: Microsoft Office Home and Business 2013, Microsoft Office 365 Home, Microsoft Office 365 ProPlus, Microsoft Office Home and Student 2013, Microsoft Office Personal 2013, Microsoft Office Professional 2013, Microsoft Office Professional Plus 2013, Microsoft Office Standard 2013, Microsoft Office 365 for enterprises, Microsoft Office 365 for small businesses

See more here:
How to uninstall Office 2013 or Office 365

"Office can’t do that right now" or “could not start your Office installation” error when installing Office 2013 or Office 365

Are you seeing one of the following errors when you try to install or update Office 2013 or Office 365:
  • We’re sorry, but we could not start your Office installation. Another installation is in progress, please try again later.

            

  • Office is busy. Office can’t do that right now because your product is busy with another task. Please wait for this task to complete and try again.

  • Something went wrong. Office can’t do that right now because your product is busy with another task. Please wait for this task to complete and try again.

  • Windows cannot find ‘C:Program FilesMicrosoft Office 15clientX64integratedOffice.exe’. Make sure you typed the name correctly, and then try again.

Note The error may occur if an Office installation process is running in background, and you start another installation.

To resolve this problem, follow the steps to check for and end other Office installation then run the Fix it below. If it does not work for you, move on to the Fix it myself section and try the steps to resolve the problem.

Check for Office Installation Processes Running in the Background

How to Start the Task Manager

  1. Right-click in an empty area of the task bar, and then click Task Manager.
  2. Press Ctrl + Alt + Delete, and then click Task Manager.
  3. Press Crtl + Shift + Esc.

In the Task Manager menu, if you find that either IntegratedOffice.exe or OfficeclickTorun.exe is running, either:

  1. Click on IntegratedOffice.exe or OfficeclickTorun.exe, and then click End Task.

    OR

  2. Restart your computer.

Fix it for me

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Step 1: Download and run this Fix it to remove Office 2013 or Office 365:

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Fix this problem

(http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=9815935)


Microsoft Fix it

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IMPORTANT When you download the troubleshooter, click Save

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(See Image)

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in the File Download dialog box. When it’s done, click Open folder, find the file (the name should start with O15CTRRemove) and double-click it to run the troubleshooter. If you click Open, you may have problems running the troubleshooter.

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Step 2: If the Fix it worked to remove Office, you’ll need to reinstall Office now. Here’s how:

Sign in to your account page

(http://office.microsoft.com/redir/XT102780162.aspx)

, and click on the Install button to reinstall Office on the same PC. If you purchased Office with a DVD, use the DVD and product key that came in the product packaging to reinstall it.

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Fix it myself

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Step 1: Remove the registry subkeys of the 2013 Microsoft Office system:

Warning Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly by using Registry Editor or by using another method. These problems might require that you reinstall the operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that these problems can be solved. Modify the registry at your own risk.

Important This article contains information about how to modify the registry. Make sure that you back up the registry

(http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Back-up-the-registry)

before you modify it. Make sure that you know how to restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up, restore, and modify the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

Backup and Restore Windows 7

(http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/products/features/backup-and-restore)

Backup and Restore Windows 8

(http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-8/restore-refresh-reset-pc)

Follow these steps to delete the registry keys:

For a Windows 7 PC

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  1. Click Start>All Programs>Accessories folder.
  2. Right-click on Command Prompt and choose Run as Administrator.
  3. Click Yes to the User Account Control prompt.
  4. In the command prompt, type regedit and press Enter.
  5. Click the following registry subkeys:
    • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESoftwareMicrosoftOffice15.0
    • HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftOffice15.0
  6. On the File menu, click Export, type DeletedKey01, and then click Save.
  7. On the Edit menu, click Delete, and then click Yes to confirm.

Step 2: If the steps worked to remove Office, you’ll need to reinstall Office now. Here’s how:

Sign in to your account page

(http://office.microsoft.com/redir/XT102780162.aspx)

, and click on the Install button to reinstall Office on the same PC. If you purchased Office with a DVD, use the DVD and product key that came in the product packaging to reinstall it.

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For a Windows 8 PC

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  1. From the Start screen, start typing Command Prompt.
  2. Touch and hold Command Prompt and then swipe down.
  3. Choose Run as Administrator and then click Yes to the User Account Control prompt.
  4. In the command prompt, type regedit and press Enter.
  5. Click the following registry subkeys:
    • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESoftwareMicrosoftOffice15.0
    • HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftOffice15.0
  6. On the File menu, click Export, type DeletedKey01, and then click Save.
  7. On the Edit menu, click Delete, and then click Yes to confirm.

Step 2: If the steps worked to remove Office, you’ll need to reinstall Office now. Here’s how:

Sign in to your account page

(http://office.microsoft.com/redir/XT102780162.aspx)

, and click on the Install button to reinstall Office on the same PC. If you purchased Office with a DVD, use the DVD and product key that came in the product packaging to reinstall it.

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Article ID: 2809219 – Last Review: October 17, 2014 – Revision: 7.1


Applies to
  • Microsoft Office Home and Business 2013
  • Microsoft Office Home and Student 2013
  • Microsoft Office Professional 2013
  • Microsoft Office 365 Home
  • Microsoft Office 365 for small businesses
  • Microsoft Office 365 ProPlus
  • Microsoft Office 365 for enterprises

See the original post:
"Office can’t do that right now" or “could not start your Office installation” error when installing Office 2013 or Office 365

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