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HOW TO: Keep a Jet 3.x Database in Top Working Condition

Microsoft Jet is the database engine that is used by default by Microsoft Access. This article provides a list of best practices that you can use to help keep your Jet database in top working condition. This article addresses a database running both in a single and in a multiuser environment.

BEST PRACTICES

This section applies to all Jet databases whether you are the sole user of the database or whether the database is being used by multiple users over a network.

Verify That the Latest Operating System Service Pack Is Installed

Install the latest operating system service pack. This makes sure that you have the latest bug fixes.

Periodically, Microsoft provides service packs and updates to Office to make sure that the best performance and the best interoperability are maintained with other programs.

For additional information about how to obtain the latest Service Pack for Office 97, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

194377

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/194377/
)

OFF97: Overview of the Updated Microsoft Office 97 SR-2 Patch

To verify that you have the latest service packs installed for your operating system, visit the following Microsoft Web site:

If you are working in a network environment, it is important to make sure the network file server has the latest operating system service pack to make sure that it has the latest bug fixes for the network redirector and file system.

Verify That the Latest Microsoft Jet Service Pack Is Installed

Install the latest Microsoft Jet service pack. This makes sure that you have the latest bug fixes to Microsoft Jet. To download the latest Jet 4.0 Service Pack, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

172733

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/172733/EN-US/
)

ACC97: Updated Version of Microsoft Jet 3.5 Available for Download

If you are in a network environment, you must install the latest Microsoft Jet service pack on all client computers. Note that you do not have to install the Microsoft Jet service pack on the network file server unless the network file server also runs one or more applications that use Microsoft Jet.

Use Efficient Database Design

An efficiently designed database improves the performance of the database. It also helps to reduce the possibility that the file will become corrupted.

For additional information about the best practices for designing a database, click the article number below
to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

288949

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/288949/EN-US/
)

ACC: Where to Find Information About Designing a Database in Access


Use a Matching Jet Database File Format for the Version of the Jet Engine That Is Being Used

For best performance and stability, use a Microsoft Jet 4.0 format database when you are using Microsoft Jet 4.0 clients. Likewise, use a Microsoft Jet 3.0 format database when you are using Microsoft Jet 3.5 clients, and so on.

Here is a table of the currently available Jet formats and what translator dll is used (if any) to talk to this format when you are using a Microsoft Jet 3.5 client:

   Access Version	Jet Format    Translator Dll Used
   --------------	----------    -------------------
    Access 2.0    	Jet 2.0       msrd2x40.dll
    Access 95     	Jet 3.0       none
    Access 97     	Jet 3.0       none
				

This chart shows that Microsoft Access 95 and Access 97 create a Microsoft Jet 3.0 format database file. If you are using a Microsoft Jet 3.5 client, it is best to use a Microsoft Jet 3.0 format database.

Here is a list of commonly used Microsoft Jet database engine clients and what associated Jet engine version they use:

   Client Application          Jet Engine Used    Recommended Jet DB Format
   -------------------------   ---------------    -------------------------
    Access 2.0                       Jet 2.0             Jet 2.0
    Access 95                        Jet 3.0             Jet 3.0
    Access 97                        Jet 3.5             Jet 3.0
    Access 2000                      Jet 4.0             Jet 4.0
    Access 2002                      Jet 4.0             Jet 4.0
    DAO 3.0                          Jet 3.0             Jet 3.0
    DAO 3.5                          Jet 3.5             Jet 3.0
    DA0 3.6                          Jet 4.0             Jet 4.0
    Microsoft.JET.OLEDB.3.51         Jet 3.5             Jet 3.0
    Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0          Jet 4.0             Jet 4.0
    Access ODBC Driver*              Jet 4.0             Jet 4.0
				

NOTE: The Microsoft Access ODBC driver that is included with MDAC 2.0 or earlier uses Microsoft Jet 3.5. The Microsoft Access ODBC driver that is included with MDAC 2.1 and MDAC 2.5 uses Microsoft Jet 4.0. MDAC 2.6 and later versions do not include the Microsoft Access ODBC driver at all.

In certain situations (for example, when you have both older and newer Jet applications sharing the same database file) you may not be able to use the latest Jet database file format. This is because older Jet engines cannot read or write to a newer Jet database file format. In this case, must use the older format and use the translator dlls.

Avoid Using Reserved Words and Characters for Object and Field Names

Avoid using reserved words and characters when you name objects and fields in your database. In some situations, reserved words or characters used alone or in combination with other words but surrounded by spaces can result in database corruption.

For additional information about reserved words and characters in Microsoft Access, click the article numbers below
to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

109312

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/109312/EN-US/
)

ACC: Reserved Words in Microsoft Access

151801

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/151801/EN-US/
)

ACC: Field Named “Application” Causes Error

For more information about reserved words and characters, click Contents and Index on the Help menu, click the Index tab in Access Help, type the following text

reserved words

and then double-click the selected text to go to the “Microsoft Jet Database Engine SQL Reserved Words” topic. If you are unable to find the information you need, ask the Office Assistant.

Periodically Compact Your Microsoft Jet Database

If you make frequent changes in a database, parts of the database may become fragmented. Therefore, it is a good idea to periodically run the Compact Database utility in Microsoft Access. If you do not have a copy of Microsoft Access, you can still compact the database by using the JetComp utility. Jetcomp.exe comes with the latest service pack for Microsoft Jet 3.5.

For additional information about how to obtain the latest service pack for Microsoft Jet 3.5, click the article number below
to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

172733

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/172733/EN-US/
)

ACC97: Updated Version of Microsoft Jet 3.5 Available for Download

If you want to use Jetcomp.exe with a Microsoft Access run-time database, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

184582

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/184582/EN-US/
)

ODE97: Error Running Jetcomp.exe with Access 97 Run-Time Database

Schedule compacts depending on how much the data changes. If the data does not change that often, you do not have to compact that much. If there are many and frequent updates, inserts, and deletes, compact more. Even though there is no formal rule for how frequently to compact, Microsoft recommends that you compact on a regular basis.

The next few paragraphs explain the compacting process that is used by Microsoft Jet in more detail. For a more general explanation of compacting a database, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

92681

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/92681/EN-US/
)

ACC: Defragment and Compact Database to Improve Performance

The Microsoft Jet engine treats a Microsoft Access database file as a series of 2048-byte blocks, much in the same way as a typical file system treats data on your hard disk. The complete set of records in a Microsoft Jet table is stored by series of these blocks, each block pointing to the next block. Each block can hold one or more records, depending upon how many fields and how much data is in each record. Over time, when records are added and deleted from the table, the table blocks will become fragmented inside the database file.

Compacting a Microsoft Jet database “defragments” these blocks and tries to place each table in a contiguous range of blocks. This improves read and write performance to the table.

Indexes in a Microsoft Access database are also stored in 2048-byte blocks, and can become fragmented just like the table records.

When it compacts a Microsoft Jet database, Jet updates table statistics stored inside the database. One key table statistic is the number of records in a table. If the number of records in the table statistics differs greatly from the actual number of records in the table, performance may not be as good. For example, if the table statistics indicate that there are a small number of records in the table, the Jet database engine optimizer will not use any indexes on the table when it performs seeks or joins. If there really is a small number of records, this is actually more efficient. But if there is a large number of records, this can become extremely inefficient. The key concept here is that if large numbers of records are added and deleted and updated, it is best to compact the database more frequently.

Microsoft Jet will also re-optimize stored queries in the database during compacting to reflect the updated table statistics. Therefore, stored query performance can also be improved by more frequent compacting.

Back Up Your Microsoft Jet Database File on a Regular Basis

It is best to choose a backup schedule that corresponds to the amount of data that you can afford to lose. For example, if you cannot afford to lose more than a day’s worth of data, back up on a daily basis. If you can afford to lose a week’s worth of data, back up weekly, and so on. A full database file backup is the best way to make sure that you can recover your Microsoft Jet database file if corruption occurs.

IMPORTANT: If you are in a network environment, you must shut down all Microsoft Jet clients before you back up the Microsoft Access database file. If you do not, you may create a backup file with incomplete or inconsistent data. Test your backups regularly to make sure that your backups are good.

ADDITIONAL BEST PRACTICES FOR NETWORK ENVIRONMENTS

Microsoft Jet is a file-sharing database system. A file-sharing database is one in which all the processing of the file takes place at the client. When a file-sharing database, such as Microsoft Jet, is used in a multiuser
environment, multiple client processes are using file read, write, and locking operations on the same shared file across a network. If, for any reason, a process cannot be completed, the file can be left in an incomplete or a corrupted state. Two examples of when a process may not be completed is when a client is terminated unexpectedly or when a network connection to a server is dropped.

Microsoft Jet is not intended to be used with high-stress, high-concurrency, 24×7 server applications, such as Web, commerce, transactional, and messaging servers. For these type of applications, the best solution is to switch to a true client/server-based database system such as Microsoft Data Engine (MSDE) or Microsoft SQL Server. When you use Microsoft Jet in high-stress applications such as Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS), customers have reported database corruption, stability issues such as IIS crashing or locking up, and also a sudden and persistent failure of the driver to connect to a valid database that requires re-starting the IIS service.

The following is a list of recommendations to follow when you share a Microsoft Jet (Microsoft Access) database file on a network file server.

Opportunistic Locking (oplocks) on the Network File Server

Microsoft has discovered an issue where opportunistic locking can increase the risk of Jet database corruption when the file is shared by two or more clients on a network file server. This issue applies to Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Microsoft Windows 2000, and Novell file servers that support opportunistic locking. This issue also applies to clients that are running Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Microsoft Windows 2000, or Microsoft Windows XP, and that connect to a file server that supports opportunistic locking.

Windows 2000

To reduce the chance that this problem can occur on computers that run Windows 2000, you must install Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 (SP3) on the Windows 2000 file server where the Access database file is located. Then, you must install Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 on each Windows 2000 client computer that connects to the Windows 2000 file server.
For additional information about how you can obtain and how you can install Windows 2000 Service Pack3, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

260910

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/260910/EN-US/
)

How to Obtain the Latest Windows 2000 Service Pack

If you have Microsoft Windows 95, Microsoft Windows 98, Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me), or Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 clients, you do not have to install the service pack that is mentioned in the Knowledge Base article 260910 on these clients.

Windows XP

To avoid the problem on computers that are running Windows XP, install the security update that is mentioned in the following Knowledge Base article. You must do this for each Windows XP client computer that connects to the file server where the Access database is located.

329170

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/329170/EN-US/
)

MS02-070: Flaw in SMB Signing May Permit Group Policy to Be Modified

If you have Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Millennium Edition, or Windows NT 4.0 clients, you do not have to install the security update that is mentioned in the Knowledge Base article 329170 on these clients.

Disable Opportunistic Locking

If you use Windows NT 4.0, and the following problems occur:

  • You cannot install Windows 2000 SP3 and the Windows XP security update.
  • You installed Windows 2000 SP3 and the Windows XP security update, but you still see frequent corruption.

You can disable opportunistic locking to avoid the problem.

IMPORTANT: Disabling opportunistic locking may adversely affect the performance of other applications. If you have questions about this, contact Microsoft Windows technical support.

For additional information about disabling opportunistic locking on Windows NT 4.0, click the article number below
to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

129202

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/129202/EN-US/
)

PC Ext: Explanation of Opportunistic Locking on Windows NT

For additional information about disabling opportunistic locking on Windows 2000, click the article number below
to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

296264

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/296264/EN-US/
)

Configuring Opportunistic Locking in Windows 2000

To disable opportunistic locking on a Novell file server, Microsoft recommends that you contact Novell technical support. For information about how to contact Novell, click the appropriate article number in the following list to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

65416

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/65416/EN-US/
)

Hardware and Software Third-Party Vendor Contact List, A-K

60781

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/60781/EN-US/
)

Hardware and Software Third-Party Vendor Contact List, L-P

60782

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/60782/EN-US/
)

Hardware and Software Third-Party Vendor Contact List, Q-Z

Microsoft provides third-party contact information to help you find technical support. This contact information may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this third-party contact information.

Issues to Consider When You Share a Microsoft Jet Database

If you can, do not share a Microsoft Jet database file that is stored on a Microsoft Windows 95, a Microsoft Windows 98, or a Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me) file share with Windows NT or Windows 2000 clients. When you have a mixture of computers on a network with some computers running Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me and some running Windows NT or Windows 2000, and you have to share the database with other network users, Microsoft recommends that you store and share the database file on a Windows NT or Windows 2000 server with opportunistic locking disabled.
Corruption can occur if you have Windows NT or Windows 2000 client computers share a file that is stored on a Windows 95, a Windows 98, or a Windows Me file share. This can occur even if the Windows NT or Windows 2000 client have opportunistic locking disabled. This issue is still under investigation, and Microsoft will post further information to this article when it becomes available.


Use a Robust File Server

Make sure that you have a robust file server that can handle the number of users and the requests that are being made to the Microsoft Jet database file. Additionally, make sure that the file server is not overtaxed with handling many other processes, such as acting as a Windows Domain Controller, Exchange Server, and SQL Server. The reason for this recommendation is that a network administrator, or another owner of the server, may reboot the computer to fix a problem with another important service (such as the mail server), or may reboot after applying new software, a service pack, or hotfix, and may forget that the Microsoft Jet database is currently shared on the server. Rebooting the file server will cause unexpected interruption of the client connections to the database and may cause database corruption. To prevent this interrupted client connection, all clients must close the database before the file server is rebooted or before software updates to the file server are applied.

A robust file server must also be placed in a secured location where it cannot be accidentally switched off. The server must have an uninterrupted power supply (UPS) to protect it from intermittent power outages or power fluctuations. The network file server must also have high performance hard drives, a good network card, and plenty of RAM to make sure that the server can handle the load that is placed on it.

Verify Network Connectivity

Make sure that you have a stable and fast network with solid network connectivity to the network file server. Avoid using Microsoft Jet over a WAN, a modem connection, FTP (or any other less-than-reliable network transport). Because Microsoft Jet is a file-sharing database system, any less-than-reliable network transport increases the chances of a dropped client. This can increase the chance of database corruption.

Minimize the Number of Connections Made from Each Client

If you can, design each client to use one, and only one, connection to the Microsoft Jet database. Each connection to a Jet database represents an independent client to the database, even when these connections come from the same client process. To optimize performance and network I/O and to reduce the multiuser stress on the back-end database, design the client application to use a single connection to the Jet database, and then share this connection over multiple recordsets as needed. This has the added benefit of preventing read/write delays in the client application. By default, there is a five-second delay between writing a value to the database and being able to read this updated value when writing and reading on two different Jet connections, even if the two connections reside in the same client process. If you use a single connection, you avoid this issue.

Use ADO to Access a Microsoft Jet Database

When you access a Microsoft Jet database from ADO, Microsoft recommends that you use the Microsoft Jet OLEDB provider instead of the Microsoft Access ODBC driver. For additional information about this topic, click the article number below
to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

222135

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/222135/EN-US/
)

ACC97: Using Microsoft Jet with IIS


Move to a Transactional Database Engine to Gain Additional Integrity

Unlike a file-based database engine, a server-based database engine such as Microsoft SQL Server processes all of the multiple client requests to a database at the server. The server keeps track of these requests in a transaction log. If, for any reason, a request cannot be fulfilled, the server rolls back or does not process the request. This reduces the possibility that the database will be left in an incomplete or corrupted state.

Before you upgrade from a file-based database engine to a server-based database engine, however, consider the advantages and disadvantages of doing so.

For additional information about choosing the most appropriate database engine for your purposes, click the article number below
to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

168549

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/168549/EN-US/
)

ACC97: Choosing the Appropriate Database White Paper Available in Download Center

Taken from:
HOW TO: Keep a Jet 3.x Database in Top Working Condition

ACC97: How to Use the StrConv Function to Capitalize Words and Phrases

This article provides examples for using a built-in function called StrConv that you can use to capitalize the first character of a word or a set of words. This function is not affected by leading spaces, but it does have the following limitations for some names:

  • Changes “MacDonald” to “Macdonald.”
  • Changes “van Buren” to “Van Buren.”
  • Changes “James Pratt VI” to “James Pratt Vi.”
The StrConv function can be used to change the case of a string to uppercase, to lowercase, or so that the first letter is uppercase. The syntax is StrConv(string, conversion), where “string” is the text string and “conversion” is 1, 2, or 3. For “conversion”, uppercase is 1, lowercase is 2, and 3 makes the first letter of each word uppercase.

When writing the StrConv function in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), instead of the integers 1, 2, or 3, you can also use one of the following constants:

vbUpperCase Converts the entire string to uppercase.
vbLowerCase Converts the entire string to lowercase.
vbProperCase Converts the first letter of each word to uppercase and the remaining letters to lowercase.

NOTE: The StrConv function has more constants than just the three that are mentioned here; however, this article focuses only on the three constants that are used for case conversion.

Demonstrating the StrConv Function

  1. Start Microsoft Access, and then open a new blank database.
  2. Create a new table with the following fields:
       Field Name: FirstName
       Data Type: Text
    
       Field Name: LastName
       Data Type: Text
    						

    Save the table as MyNamesList.

  3. Add the following sample names to the table:
       john chen
       joanna fuller
       becki culbert
       jeff smith
    					

Using StrConv in Code in the AfterUpdate Property of a Control

  1. Create a new form that is based on the MyNamesList table.
  2. Add text box controls for the FirstName and LastName fields by dragging the field names from the field list.
  3. If the property sheet is not visible, on the View menu, click Properties.
  4. Set the AfterUpdate property of the LastName text box to the following event procedure:
    Private Sub LastName_AfterUpdate()
    LastName = StrConv(LastName, vbProperCase)
    End Sub
    					

  5. On the File menu, click Close.
  6. Open the form that you created in step 1 in Form view, and enter some new names in lowercase. Note that when you return to these records, the LastName field is now correctly capitalized.

Using StrConv() in a Query

  1. Create a new query that is based on the MyNamesList table, and then type the following line in the first Field cell of the query design grid:

    FullName: StrConv(LastName & “, ” & FirstName, 3)

  2. Run the query.

    Note that the LastName and FirstName fields are concatenated and any names beginning with lowercase are converted so that the first letter is uppercase.

Using StrConv in a Macro

For more information about other constants of the StrConv function, search the Help Index for StrConv, and then click the StrConv function topic.

Article ID: 302499 – Last Review: June 19, 2014 – Revision: 4.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Access 97 Standard Edition
kbhowto kbprogramming KB302499
Retired KB Content Disclaimer

This article was written about products for which Microsoft no longer offers support. Therefore, this article is offered “as is” and will no longer be updated.

Link:
ACC97: How to Use the StrConv Function to Capitalize Words and Phrases

Troubleshooting Check Name errors

The article describes typical troubleshooting steps that
you can use to determine the reason for following client error message:

The name could not be resolved. The name could not be
matched to a name in the address list.

Note This article assumes that you are familiar with Ldp.exe.

Warning If you use the ADSI Edit snap-in, the LDP utility, or any other LDAP version 3 client, and you incorrectly modify the attributes of Active Directory objects, you can cause serious problems. These problems may require you to reinstall Microsoft Windows 2000 Server, Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server, Microsoft Exchange Server 2003, or both Windows and Exchange. Microsoft cannot guarantee that problems that occur if you incorrectly modify Active Directory object attributes can be solved. Modify these attributes at your own risk.

To troubleshoot this
issue, follow these steps.

Note In this procedure, the “user account” is the Active Directory
user account whose name cannot be resolved, the “administrator account” is any
account in the Domain admins group, and “user” refers to the user whose account
you are logged on as.

  1. Verify that the Active Directory account that you use
    either to create the client profile or to log on to the mailbox has been
    mailbox-enabled.

    Verify that the account that you use to log on to
    the workstation or the account for which you enter credentials in the Outlook Enter password dialog box is mailbox-enabled. If this account is not
    mailbox-enabled, the account cannot check names.

    To make this
    account mailbox-enabled, start the Active Directory Users and Computers
    snap-in, right-click the user account, click Exchange Tasks, and then click
    Create mailbox.

  2. Verify that the user can use the Active Directory account
    to view sibling objects in the Users container (or in the Active Directory
    organizational unit that contains the user account). To do so:
    1. Start Ldp.exe, and then type the user credentials of
      the account that is not resolving to bind to port 389 of a domain controller
      (type the user credentials in the following format:
      domain/user/password).
    2. Find the user in the User container or its parent
      organizational unit.

    The user must be able to find themselves in their
    organizational unit while they are bound to the domain controller with their
    credentials. If Ldp.exe reports that there are “no children” in the
    organizational unit, the computer may not have the appropriate permissions.

    To resolve this issue:

    1. Start the Active Directory Users and Computers snap-in,
      click View, and then make sure that Advanced
      Features
      is checked.
    2. Right-click Users, click the
      Security tab, and then click the Authenticated
      Users
      group.
    3. Verify that Read permissions are
      assigned to either the Users container or to the
      organizational unit where the accounts are located.
  3. Verify that the user account has been stamped by the
    Recipient Update Service after you mailbox-enable the user account. To do so,
    start Ldp.exe, use the user credentials to bind, and then verify that the
    following attributes have been populated to the account:
    • showInAddressBook ()
    • textEncodedORAddress
    • msExchUserAccountControl
    • msExchALObjectVersion
    • msExchPoliciesIncluded

    If these attributes are populated, the Recipient
    Update Service has stamped this user account. If these attributes have not been
    populated, troubleshoot the Recipient Update Service and the recipient policies
    to determine why the attributes have not been stamped.

  4. Verify that the user can see both the Global Address List
    objects that are listed in the showInAddressBook attribute and the members of the Global Address List using
    Ldp.exe. To do so:
    1. Open the showInAddressBook attribute for the user (see step 3), copy the distinguished name
      values for the Global Address List objects, and then paste these values to a
      Microsoft Notepad file.
    2. Start Ldp.exe, and then use the user credentials of the
      account that is not resolving to bind to port 389 of a domain
      controller
    3. On the View menu, click Tree.
    4. Paste the distinguished name of one of the Global
      Address List objects in the Base Dn box.
    5. Double-click the Global Address List object that is
      displayed.

      The user should be able to see themselves as child
      objects.

    If Ldp.exe reports that there are “no children,” the Global
    Address List object may not have the appropriate permissions. A user must be
    able to see at least one Global Address List object and its members. To resolve
    this issue, start Exchange System Manager, and then make sure that the user has
    permissions to view the Global Address List object’s members. Make sure that
    the Authenticated Users group has List Content permissions.

    Note If you enter an incorrect distinguished name, Ldp.exe reports
    that there are “no children.” Make sure that you enter the correct
    distinguished name.

  5. Verify that the user can see themselves and their
    attributes in the global catalog. To do so, start Ldp.exe, and then use the
    user’s credentials to bind to the global catalog on port 3268. If the user or
    the following attributes are not visible, you may be experiencing a replication
    latency or a property promotion problem.

    • mail
    • proxyAddresses
    • showInAddressBook

    For more information about replication latency or a property
    promotion problems, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    248717

    (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/248717/
    )

    How to modify attributes that replicate to the Global Catalog

  6. Log on as an administrator, and then verify that there are
    no duplicates in the addressBookRoots attribute of the Microsoft Exchange object under
    Domain,cn=Configuration,cn=Services.

    You
    cannot specify both a parent container and a child of that parent as an address
    book root. For example, if you enter All Address Lists as an address book root,
    it has to be the only address book root. All your other address lists are
    listed under All Address Lists; if you enter both the parent object and child
    objects that exist under this parent object, you enter the child objects more
    than once. When you do so, Check Names and all other Global Address List and
    NSPI operations do not succeed.

  7. Verify that Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 is not installed
    on the global catalog server.
  8. If the user who is checking names is an administrator who
    is checking names for another user, confirm that the administrator account that
    is being used is mailbox-enabled.

    The administrator account and the
    user that is being checked must be members of a common Global Address List.
    (The showInAddressBook attribute for both users must contain one common Global Address
    List object.) In addition, the common Global Address List object must be the
    administrator’s Global Address List.

For more information about name resolution errors, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

309622

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/309622/
)

Clients cannot browse the global address list after you apply the Q299687 Windows 2000 security hotfix

251812

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/251812/
)

Cannot create MAPI profile in Outlook 2000, Japanese version

927612

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927612/
)

You are repeatedly prompted to enter your credentials when you try to connect to an Exchange 2003 mailbox by using Outlook 2007

Article ID: 297801 – Last Review: June 19, 2014 – Revision: 7.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Enterprise Edition
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2003 Premium Edition
  • Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2003 Standard Edition

See more here:
Troubleshooting Check Name errors

How to remove underlines from hyperlinks in FrontPage 2002

This article describes the prefered method for removing the
underline from a hyperlink in Microsoft FrontPage 2002.

Microsoft provides programming examples for illustration only, without warranty either expressed or implied. This includes, but is not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. This article assumes that you are familiar with the programming language that is being demonstrated and with the tools that are used to create and to debug procedures. Microsoft support engineers can help explain the functionality of a particular procedure, but they will not modify these examples to provide added functionality or construct procedures to meet your specific requirements.

Removing the Underline from a Single Hyperlink

There are two ways to remove the underline formatting from a
hyperlink:

  • Use the Underline button on the Formatting toolbar.

    1. Select the hyperlink from which you want to remove the
      underline.
    2. On the Formatting toolbar, click the Underline button.

      The hyperlink will no longer be
      underlined.

  • Use the text-decoration cascading style sheet (CSS)
    attribute.

    1. In FrontPage, click the HTML tab at the bottom of the FrontPage window.
    2. Locate the code that looks similar to the following:
    3. Insert the style tag with the
      style=”text-decoration:none” attribute in the anchor
      tag, so that your code looks similar to the following:
    4. On the File menu, click Save.

Removing the Underline from All Hyperlinks

You can remove the underline from all hyperlinks in a page by
adding a section to the page.

To remove the underline
from all hyperlinks on a page, follow these steps:

  1. Open the page you want to modify.
  2. Click the HTML tab.
  3. Place the following HTML code before the tag:
    
    					

  4. Click the Preview tab. Your hyperlinks no longer contain underlines.

Article ID: 293172 – Last Review: June 19, 2014 – Revision: 4.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft FrontPage 2002 Standard Edition
kbformat kbconfig kbhowtomaster KB293172

More:
How to remove underlines from hyperlinks in FrontPage 2002

You receive a "This installation package could not be opened" error message when you try to run Office XP Setup

When you try to run Microsoft Office XP Setup, you may receive one of the following error messages:

This installation package could not be opened. Verify that the package exists and that you can access it, or contact the application vendor to verify that this is a valid Windows Installer package.

-or-

This installation package could not be opened. Contact the application vendor to verify that this is a valid Windows Installer package.

One of these error messages can occur if the locally cached Windows Installer package (*.msi) file is damaged or corrupted.
To resolve this problem, follow the appropriate steps.

If You Already Installed Office XP

IMPORTANT: If Office XP is not yet installed on your computer, do not use these steps to resolve this problem. Instead, go to the “If You Are Trying to Install Office XP” section later in this article.

  1. On the Start menu, click Run.
  2. In the Open box, type the following command line, and then click OK:

    pathSetup.exe /fv version.msi

    Path in this command line is the path to your Office Setup files, and version is the version title of the MSI file that corresponds to the version of Office that you are installing.

If You Are Trying to Install Office XP

If Office XP is not yet installed on your computer, do not use the preceding steps to resolve this problem. Instead, follow these steps:

  1. Open the WindowsInstaller folder on your computer’s hard disk.
  2. Right-click any file with an .msi extension.
  3. Click Properties on the shortcut menu.

    The Subject box on the Summary tab contains the name of the product that installed the .msi file.

  4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for each .msi file in the Installer folder, and delete the .msi file for the version of Office that you are trying to install.

For additional information about this issue, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

229819

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/229819/
)

BUG: “Installing this product requires the Windows Installer” error message when you run Setup for Office 2000

Note This is a “FAST PUBLISH” article created directly from within the Microsoft support organization. The information contained herein is provided as-is in response to emerging issues. As a result of the speed in making it available, the materials may include typographical errors and may be revised at any time without notice. See Terms of Use

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151500)

for other considerations.

Article ID: 290525 – Last Review: June 19, 2014 – Revision: 1.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Office XP Professional Edition
  • Microsoft Office XP Small Business Edition
  • Microsoft Office XP Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Office XP Developer Edition
  • Microsoft Access 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Excel 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft FrontPage 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Outlook 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft PowerPoint 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Word 2002
kbtshoot kbsetup kberrmsg kbprb KB290525

See the article here:
You receive a "This installation package could not be opened" error message when you try to run Office XP Setup

OFFXP: Setup May Remove Earlier Versions of Office

When you run the Microsoft Office XP Setup program, your earlier version of Office may be removed, and you may not receive a message that informs you about this. However, you may see the following message in the Choose the type of installation you need dialog box:

Upgrade Now

Upgrades your Microsoft Office installation. Setup will remove your previous versions, and install the new version based on your current configuration.

Your earlier version of Office is automatically removed if you click Upgrade Now in the Choose the type of installation you need dialog box.
If you click Custom, Typical, or Complete in the Choose the type of installation you need dialog box, you will eventually see the Remove previous versions of Office applications dialog box. In this dialog box, you see the following options:

  • Remove all previous versions
  • Keep all previous versions
  • Remove only the following applications

Also, each program from an earlier version of Office is listed in this dialog box, with a check box next to the program name.

The Office Setup program detects the following versions of Office programs for removal when you are upgrading to Office XP.

   Programs       Version
   --------------------------------------

   Access         2000, 97, 95, 2.0
   Excel          2000, 97, 95, 5.0
   FrontPage      2000, 98, 97, 1.0
   Outlook        2000, 98, 97
   PowerPoint     2000, 97, 95, 4.0
   Publisher      2000, 98, 97, 3.0, 2.0
   Word           2000, 97, 95, 6.0
				

NOTE: Although Microsoft does not recommend this configuration, it is possible to install and use more than one version of Office on a single computer. For
example, you can install and use both Office XP and Office 2000 on the same computer.

For additional information about qualifying upgrade products, click the article number below
to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

210437

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/210437/EN-US/
)

OFF2000: Products That Qualify for the Microsoft Office Upgrade

How to Remove Earlier Versions of Office

When you install Office, Setup checks to see whether any components from earlier Office versions are installed on your computer. If Setup detects these earlier components, and you select any option except Upgrade Now in the Choose the type of installation you need dialog box, Setup displays the Remove previous versions of Office applications dialog box.

If you select Remove all previous versions, Setup removes the listed programs that are installed from earlier versions of Office. This helps prevent unnecessary files from occupying disk space on your computer.

You can also selectively remove programs from earlier versions of Office by selecting Remove only the following applications and then selecting the check box next to the program name.

If you remove older Office components, other programs that use these older components may not work correctly. For example, assume that you want to install Office XP, but previously you developed custom programs that work specifically in Access 7.0. To use the custom program, Access 7.0 must be available after you install Office XP. Therefore, you should perform a Custom installation of Office XP, select Remove only the following applications, and clear the check box next to Microsoft Access (and any other programs that you want to keep).

How to Keep Earlier Components

Use either of the following methods to set up Office XP and keep earlier versions of Office programs on the same computer.

Method 1: Select “Keep All Previous Versions”

  1. Run the Microsoft Office XP Setup program, and then select Custom, Typical, or Complete.
  2. In the Remove previous versions of Office Applications dialog box, select Keep all previous versions.

When Setup is completed, the older Office programs will be available.

Method 2: Select “Remove Only the Following Applications”

The Keep all previous versions option is not available if a version of Outlook is already installed on your computer, and you are trying to install Outlook 2002. This is because only one version of Outlook can be installed on your computer. In this case, you can select Remove only the following applications, and then clear the check boxes next to the earlier Office version programs that you want to keep.

How to Install Earlier Versions of Office After You Install Office XP

If you removed the earlier versions of Office, you must reinstall the programs. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Uninstall Office XP.
  2. Run the Setup program for each of the older programs, and then reinstall them. Start with the oldest version first, and proceed to the newest version.
  3. Verify that the older programs work correctly.
  4. Run the Setup program for Microsoft Office XP again, and then select Custom, Typical, or Complete.
  5. In the Remove previous versions of Office Applications dialog box, select Keep all previous versions.

After you complete these steps, the older programs and Microsoft Office XP programs will be available.

How to Remove Earlier Office Programs After You Install Office XP

To remove earlier versions of Office programs after you install Office XP, do either of the following:

  • Run the Setup program for each of the older programs, and then click Remove All.
    -or-
  • Use the Microsoft Office Removal Wizard to remove the older components. Follow these steps:
    1. Double-click Offcln.exe in the FilesPfilesMsofficeOffice10 folder on your Office XP CD.
    2. In the Removal Options dialog box, select Let me decide which Microsoft Office applications will be removed.
    3. Click Next.
    4. In the Applications to Keep column, select the program that you want to remove, and then click <<.
    5. Repeat step 4 for each program that you want to remove.
    6. Click Next.
    7. In the Files You Can Remove dialog box, review the list of files that will be removed. Click Next.
    8. Click Finish to remove the items that you selected.
Note This is a “FAST PUBLISH” article created directly from within the Microsoft support organization. The information contained herein is provided as-is in response to emerging issues. As a result of the speed in making it available, the materials may include typographical errors and may be revised at any time without notice. See Terms of Use

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151500)

for other considerations.

Article ID: 290366 – Last Review: June 19, 2014 – Revision: 1.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Office XP Professional Edition
  • Microsoft Office XP Small Business Edition
  • Microsoft Office XP Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Office XP Developer Edition
  • Microsoft Access 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Excel 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft FrontPage 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Outlook 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft PowerPoint 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Word 2002

See the original post:
OFFXP: Setup May Remove Earlier Versions of Office

Restriction settings are not applied after you configure the Delivery Restrictions option in Exchange Server

In Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server or
Exchange Server 2003, after you configure the Delivery Restrictions option on a connector, the restriction settings may not be
applied.
The restriction checking functionality is controlled by a
registry key that is set on the Exchange
bridgehead server
that is the source for the connector that is being
checked. If you need to apply a restriction to a connector which restricts who
is able to send data to the designated link, you must manually add the restriction checking registry value.
WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious
problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft
cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry
Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
To
enable restriction checking:

  1. Start Registry Editor (Regedt32.exe).
  2. Locate and click the following key in the registry:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/System/CurrentControlSet/Services/Resvc/Parameters/

  3. On the Edit menu, click Add Value, and then add the following registry value:

    Value Name: CheckConnectorRestrictions
    Data Type: REG_DWORD
    Radix: Decimal
    Value: 1

  4. Quit Registry Editor.

After you make the change to the registry, restart any related
Internet Information Services (IIS) services, click the connector, and then
click the Delivery Restrictions tab to enable the restriction option.

This feature is by design.
When you enable the Delivery Restrictions option, the computers performance may be affected. When you set
the registry value, every message for every destination is checked.

Article ID: 279813 – Last Review: June 19, 2014 – Revision: 4.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Enterprise Edition

Taken from:
Restriction settings are not applied after you configure the Delivery Restrictions option in Exchange Server

Adding a registry key to recategorize messages

Messages on an Exchange 2000 server may get stuck in the pre-routing queue if Microsoft Internet Information Service (IIS) has overwritten the Exchange 2000 configuration. It is very unlikely that this can happen, however, if this does occur, all the messages will not get routed. To correct this problem, refer to the “More Information” section.

The following error message may be logged in the Application event log:

Event Type: Warning
Event Source: smtpsvc
Event Category: None
Event ID: 4000
Date: 10/30/2000
Time: 2:10:10 PM
User: N/A
Computer: SERVERNAME
Description: Message delivery to the remote domain ‘_c78290b817c75f4bac724d36582fdeea_D’ failed. The error message is ‘Unable to bind to the destination server in DNS.

You can use a telnet connection to the server on port 25 to identify if the wrong version of the .dll file is used. At a command prompt, type telnet hostname 25. You will receive a response such as

“220 hostname Microsoft ESMTP MAIL Service, Version: 5.0.2195.1600 ready at Thu, 16 Nov 2000 12:25:39 -0600″ User name

Next, type ehlo. You will see a list of supported commands, such as following:

250-hostname Hello IP Address
250-TURN
250-ATRN
250-SIZE
250-ETRN
250-PIPELINING
250-DSN
250-ENHANCEDSTATUSCODES
250-8bitmime
250-BINARYMIME
250-CHUNKING
250-VRFY
250-X-EXPS GSSAPI NTLM LOGIN
250-X-EXPS=LOGIN
250-AUTH GSSAPI NTLM LOGIN
250-AUTH=LOGIN
250-XEXCH50
250-X-LINK2STATE
250 OK

If you are missing commands such as X-LINK2STATE OR XEXCH50, the Microsoft Windows 2000 version of the .dll is in use instead of the Exchange 2000 version.

For more information about the latest service pack for Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

301378

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/301378/
)

How to obtain the latest Exchange 2000 Server service pack

Warning Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly by using Registry Editor or by using another method. These problems might require that you reinstall the operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that these problems can be solved. Modify the registry at your own risk.

Implement the following registry key that will cause recategorization of mail sitting in the pre-routing queue.

  1. Start Registry Editor (Regedt32.exe).
  2. Locate the following key in the registry:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESystemCurrentControlSetServicesSMTPSVCQueuing

  3. On the Edit menu, click Add Value, and then add the following registry value:

    Value Name: ResetMessageStatus
    Data Type: REG_DWORD
    Radix: Hexadecimal
    Value: 1

  4. Quit Registry Editor.

After you add the preceding registry value:

  1. Re-install Exchange 2000 to restore the proper Exchange 2000 configuration.
  2. During the upgrade, SMTPSVC will be stopped and restarted. After SMTPSVC is automatically restarted, the previously queued messages to be enumerated and reprocessed.
  3. After upgrade is completed and SMTPSVC has been restarted, you can delete the ResetMessageStatus registry key.

If Exchange 2000 has already been reinstalled without setting the ResetMessageStatus registry key, some of the messages will remain stuck in the pre-routing queue. To resolve this:

  1. At a command prompt, run the following command:

    net stop SMTPSVC

  2. Set the ResetMessageStatus registry key to a value of 1.
  3. At a command prompt, run the following command:

    net start SMTPSVC

    Previously queued messages will be enumerated and reprocessed.

  4. Delete the ResetMessageStatus registry key.

NOTE: Unless you implement the ResetMessageStatus registry entry, all mail that was categorized without Exchange 2000 will eventually generate non-delivery reports (NDRs).

For more information about how to download the fix that contains this feature, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

291222

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/291222/
)

Rollup of selected Exchange 2000 Server post-release fixes

The English version of this feature should have the following file attributes or later:

Component: Transport

Collapse this tableExpand this table

File name Version
Phatq.dll 6.0.4418.25

Note By default, the

ResetMessageStatus

registry key is enabled on Exchange cluster servers to allow for the recategorization of messages during failover of the SMTP resource.

Article ID: 279616 – Last Review: June 19, 2014 – Revision: 2.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Standard Edition

Read More:
Adding a registry key to recategorize messages

The directory object may have an unknown class or cannot be located

You may observe the following symptoms in Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server:

  • When you attempt to create an object, you may receive either of the following messages:

    The object name of object already exists. Enter a unique directory name for this object.

    Windows cannot create the new user object because the pre-Windows 2000 logon name name of object is already in use.
    Select another name, and then try again.

  • Objects may be missing in the Active Directory directory service. When you search for an object in the user interface (either Exchange Service Manager or Active Directory Users and Computers), you cannot find it. If you use the ADSI Edit utility, you can observe the object, but the object class is unknown, and you cannot make any modifications to it.
This behavior can occur if you do not have sufficient permissions. For example, an administrator may impose a Deny all setting to the Everyone group for that particular object.
To resolve this behavior, use any of the following methods.

Method 1

Run the DSACLS tool that is located in the Windows 2000 Supports Tools CD-ROM: Click Run, and then type: dsacls “dn of object” (use quotes if there are any spaces in the distinguished name DN).

The DN of the object can be determined by using the LDP.exe utility.

Warning If you use the ADSI Edit snap-in, the LDP utility, or any other LDAP version 3 client, and you incorrectly modify the attributes of Active Directory objects, you can cause serious problems. These problems may require you to reinstall Microsoft Windows 2000 Server, Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server, Microsoft Exchange Server 2003, or both Windows and Exchange. Microsoft cannot guarantee that problems that occur if you incorrectly modify Active Directory object attributes can be solved. Modify these attributes at your own risk.

For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

260745

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/260745/
)

Using the LDP utility to modify Active Directory object attributes

An example of a Store object with this problem (that can return a list of permissions on the object) is:

C:>DSACLS “CN=BAD_Object,CN=First Storage Group,CN=InformationStore,CN=S8,CN=Servers,CN=EX-ORG-Name,CN=Administrative Groups,CN=Microsoft,CN=Microsoft Exchange,CN=Services,CN=Configuration,DC=Microsoft,DC=com”

Method 2

Examine the Effective permissions on the object:

Locate any groups or users that have a Deny (group or user) full control permission (for example, the Everyone group). If the permission does not have “Inherited from parent” beside it, the permission is an explicit Deny permission and can override any inherited or explicit Allow permissions for that particular right.

You can remove the explicit Deny permission by using the graphical user interface (GUI). If the GUI does not enable you to remove this permission, use the DSACLS tool. Log on to the computer as a domain administrator or enterprise administrator because these groups typically have owner rights and cannot be completely locked out. Click Run, and then type: dsacls “dn of object” /Rgroup or username.

Refer to the preceding example in Method 1. If the previous DSACLS tool returned the following information:
Deny Everyone Full Control

Then, click Run, and type:
c:>dsacls “cn=bad_object,cn=first storage group,cn=informationstore,cn=s8,cn=servers,cn=ex-org-name,cn=administrative groups,cn=microsoft,cn=microsoft exchange,cn=services,cn=configuration,dc=microsoft,dc=com” /R everyone

The preceding command can remove all explicit permissions from the Everyone group on that object.

Method 3

Click Run, and then type the following command:

dsacls “dn of object” /G administrators:ga

This command grants the administrators group full control of the object.

Article ID: 287691 – Last Review: June 19, 2014 – Revision: 4.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbprb KB287691

See more here:
The directory object may have an unknown class or cannot be located

How to Verify That ForestPrep and DomainPrep Completed Successfully in Exchange 2000 Server or Exchange Server 2003

This step-by-step article describes how to verify that the setup /forestprep command and the setup /domainprep command ran successfully during the installation of Microsoft
Exchange 2000 Server or Microsoft Exchange Server 2003. You must have the ADSI
Edit snap-in to complete some of these steps.

Exchange 2000

ForestPrep

To verify that the setup /forestprep command completed successfully on a computer that is running
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server in an Exchange 2000 environment, use either of
the following methods:

  • Look for event ID 1575
    Event ID 1575 is recorded in the Directory Service event log
    of each domain controller where the setup /forestprep command has run. To view event ID 1575 in the Directory Service
    event log of a domain controller, follow these steps:

    1. Click Start, point to
      Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and
      then click Event Viewer.
    2. In Event Viewer, click Directory
      Service
      .
    3. In the right pane, click the Event
      header to sort the events from lowest to highest number.
    4. In the Event list, view the list of
      event ID numbers to find event ID 1575. If event ID 1575 is not in the list, setup /forestprep did not run on the domain controller.
  • Use the ADSI Edit snap-inWarning If you use the ADSI Edit snap-in, the LDP utility, or any other
    LDAP version 3 client, and you incorrectly modify the attributes of Active
    Directory objects, you can cause serious problems. These problems may require
    you to reinstall Microsoft Windows 2000 Server, Microsoft Windows Server 2003,
    Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server, Microsoft Exchange Server 2003, or both Windows
    and Exchange. Microsoft cannot guarantee that problems that occur if you
    incorrectly modify Active Directory object attributes can be solved. Modify
    these attributes at your own risk.
    To use the ADSI Edit snap-in to verify that setup /forestprep completed successfully on a computer that is running Windows 2000
    Server, follow these steps:

    1. Click Start, point to
      Programs, point to Windows 2000 Support
      Tools
      , point to Tools, and then click ADSI
      Edit
      .
    2. Expand Schema, and then click
      CN=Schema, CN=Configuration, DC=Your_Domain,
      DC=Your_Domain,
      DC=Your_Domain
      .
    3. Double-click the
      cn=ms-Exch-Schema-Version-Pt object.
    4. In the Select a property to view box,
      click rangeUpper. Note the value that is in the
      Value box. If the value is less than 4397, setup /forestprep has been run by a version of Exchange 2000 that is earlier than
      the original released version of the product. If the value is 4397, setup /forestprep has been successfully run by Exchange 2000. If the value is 6870,
      setup /forestprep has been successfully run by Exchange 2003.

DomainPrep

To determine if the setup /domainprep command has run successfully, run the Policytest utility on a
domain controller. The Policytest utility is located in the
Support/Utils/Platform folder on the Exchange 2000
Server Enterprise Edition CD. When you run this utility at a command prompt,
all the domain controllers should report the same security settings.
For
additional information about the Policytest utility, click the following
article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

281537

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/281537/
)

XADM: Description of the Policytest.exe utility

Exchange 2003

To verify that the setup /forestprep command and the setup /domainprep command completed successfully in Exchange 2003, run the
OrgPrepCheck tool from Exchange 2003 Deployment Tools. To run the OrgPrepCheck
tool, use either of the following methods.

Note You must have the LDAP protocol installed on the Exchange 5.5
computer to run Exchange Deployment Tools successfully.

  • Start OrgPrepCheck from Exchange Deployment Tools
    Use the OrgPrepCheck tool that is in the
    Exchange Deployment Tools to determine if the commands have
    been completed successfully. To do this, follow these steps:

    1. Insert the Exchange 2003 CD in your CD-ROM
      drive.
    2. On the Welcome to Exchange Server 2003
      Setup
      page, click Exchange Deployment Tools.

      Note If the Welcome to Exchange Server 2003 Setup
      page does not appear after you insert your CD, double-click
      Setup.exe, and then click Exchange Deployment
      Tools
      .

    3. Click Deploy the first Exchange 2003
      server
      .
    4. Click Coexistence with Exchange
      5.5
      .
    5. On the Phase 1 page, click
      Next.
    6. On the Phase 2 page, locate step 3,
      enter the required information, and then click Run OrgPrepCheck
      now
      .
    7. Close the Exchange Deployment Tools
      window.
    8. View the following output file to see if the setup /forestprep command and the setup /domainprep command have completed successfully:

      C:Exdeploy LogsExdeploy.log

  • Run OrgPrepCheck at a command prompt You can also run the OrgPrepCheck tool at a
    command prompt. To do this, follow these steps:

    1. Insert the Exchange 2003 CD in your CD-ROM
      drive.
    2. Click Start, and then click
      Run.
    3. In the Open box, type
      cmd, and then click OK.
    4. Locate the CD-ROM drive, and then type the following
      command:

      CD-ROM_Drive_Letter:supportexdeployexdeploy.exe /gc:global catalog server name /s:Exchange_5.5_Computer_Name /t:orgprepcheck

    5. View the following output file to see if the setup /forestprep command and the setup /domainprep command have completed successfully:

      C:Exdeploy LogsExdeploy.log

Additionally, you can use the ADSI Edit snap-in to verify that
the setup /forestprep and the setup /domainprep commands completed successfully in Exchange 2003.

ForestPrep

The Exchange 2003 setup /forestprep command writes many of its changes to the configuration naming
context in the Active Directory directory service. One of the last ForestPrep
actions sets the objectVersion attribute on the Exchange organization container to a value of
6903. To locate the objectVersion attribute, use the ADSI Edit snap-in or the LDP utility.
Warning If you use the ADSI Edit snap-in, the LDP utility, or any other
LDAP version 3 client, and you incorrectly modify the attributes of Active
Directory objects, you can cause serious problems. These problems may require
you to reinstall Microsoft Windows 2000 Server, Microsoft Windows Server 2003,
Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server, Microsoft Exchange Server 2003, or both Windows
and Exchange. Microsoft cannot guarantee that problems that occur if you
incorrectly modify Active Directory object attributes can be solved. Modify
these attributes at your own risk.

To use the ADSI Edit snap-in to view the objectVersion attribute, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, point to
    Programs, point to Windows 2000 Support
    Tools
    , point to Tools, and then click ADSI
    Edit
    .
  2. Expand Configuration Container, expand
    CN=Configuration,DC=forest_root_domain,DC=com, expand
    CN=Services, and then expand CN=Microsoft
    Exchange
    .
  3. Right-click CN=Exchange_organization_name,
    and then click Properties.
  4. In the Select which properties to view
    list, click Optional.
  5. In the Select a property to view list,
    click objectVersion. View the value in the
    Value(s) box. If the Exchange 2003 setup /forestprep command has ever been run, the objectVersion attribute has a value of 6903. If the objectVersion attribute does not have a value, or if the value appears in the
    ADSI Edit snap-in as ““, either the ForestPrep utility has not
    been run on the forest, or the domain controller that you are connected to has
    not yet received replication messages from more up-to-date domain
    controllers.

DomainPrep

The Exchange 2003 setup /domainprep command writes many of its changes to the domain naming context
in Active Directory. One of the last DomainPrep actions sets the objectVersion attribute on the Microsoft Exchange System
Objects
container to a value of 6936. To locate the objectVersion attribute, use the ADSI Edit snap-in or the LDP utility. To view
the objectVersion attribute by using the ADSI Edit snap-in,
follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, point to
    Programs, point to Windows 2000 Support
    Tools
    , point to Tools, and then click ADSI
    Edit
    .
  2. Expand Domain NC, and then expand
    DC=local_domain,DC=com.
  3. Right-click CN=Microsoft Exchange System
    Objects
    , and then click Properties.
  4. In the Select which properties to view
    list, click Optional.
  5. In the Select a property to view list,
    click objectVersion.
  6. View the value in the Value(s) box. If the
    Exchange 2003 setup /domainprep command has ever been run on the domain, the objectVersion attribute has a value of 6936. If the objectVersion attribute does not have a value, or if the value appears in the
    ADSI Edit snap-in as ““, either the DomainPrep utility has not
    been run on the domain, or the domain controller that you are connected to has
    not yet received replication messages from more up-to-date domain controllers.

These steps are useful to determine whether the Exchange 2003
Setup program (the Setup program without any additional parameters) can
continue to run on an Exchange 2003 computer. Before the Exchange 2003 Setup
program can run, the Setup program verifies that the latest Exchange
2003-specific Active Directory updates are present on the domain controller
that the Exchange computer is connected to.

For additional information about the Exchange
Server 2003 Deployment Tools, click the following article numbers to view the
articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
822942

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/822942/
)

Considerations when you upgrade to Exchange Server 2003

812593

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/812593/
)

Exchange Server 2003 Deployment Tools overview

Article ID: 274737 – Last Review: June 19, 2014 – Revision: 6.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Enterprise Edition
  • Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Standard Edition

View the original here:
How to Verify That ForestPrep and DomainPrep Completed Successfully in Exchange 2000 Server or Exchange Server 2003

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