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The Information Store service remains in a starting state in Exchange 2000 Server

When you try to start the Microsoft Exchange Information Store service, you receive the following message:
Windows is attempting to start the following service on Local Computer…

Microsoft Exchange Information Store

However, the progress indicator does not move to the right side of the Service Control dialog box, and the service never starts.

Additionally, if you run the domain controller diagnostics tool (Dcdiag), and you direct it to the global catalog server by using the dcdiag /s:”fully-qualified domain name of the global catalog server command, you receive the following output:

Starting test: Advertising
         Fatal Error:DsGetDcName (BRA1T14Y0) call failed, error 1722
         The Locator could not find the server.
         ......................... SERVERNAME failed test Advertising

Starting test: FsmoCheck
         Warning: DcGetDcName(GC_SERVER_REQUIRED) call failed, error 1722
         A Global Catalog Server could not be located - All GC's are down.
This issue may occur if there is no global catalog server available in your domain or in the root domain of your Microsoft Active Directory directory service forest. In this scenario, Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server may discover a global catalog server in another domain and try to use that global catalog server. If Exchange 2000 Server cannot resolve the host name of that global catalog server to an IP address, the Information Store service remains in the starting state and continues to try to contact the global catalog server.

This issue occurs because of a name resolution problem that causes Exchange 2000 Server to try to resolve the host name of the global catalog server by using its short (host) name instead of by using its fully-qualified domain name (FQDN).

To resolve this issue, configure the Domain Name System (DNS) suffix search list on your Exchange computer to include the domain names of all the domains where Exchange 2000 Server requires access to domain controllers. To do this, follow these steps:
  1. On the Exchange computer, right-click My Network Places, and then click Properties.
  2. Right-click the local area connection, and then click Properties.
  3. Double-click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Advanced.
  4. Click the DNS tab, and then click Append these DNS suffixes (in order).
  5. Click Add, type the domain suffix of a domain where Exchange 2000 Server requires access to a domain controller, and then click Add.

    For example, type corp.contoso.com.

  6. When you are finished adding DNS suffixes, click OK, click OK, and then click OK.
To work around this issue, configure WINS servers in your domain, or configure your network to permit broadcast message traffic to reach your domain controllers.

For additional information, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

259427

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/259427/
)

“SETUP /FORESTPREP” Does Not Work When Windows 2000 Sites Are Incorrectly Defined

275335

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/275335/
)

XADM: Exchange 2000 Server Name Requirements

For additional information about the Dcdiag tool, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

265706

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/265706/
)

DCDiag and NetDiag in Windows 2000 Facilitate Domain Join and DC Creation

Article ID: 831600 – Last Review: November 3, 2013 – Revision: 2.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbprb KB831600

View original post here:
The Information Store service remains in a starting state in Exchange 2000 Server

Post-Exchange 2000 Server Service Pack 3 messaging database fixes that are available

This article describes Exchange 2000 Server Messaging
Database (MDB) bugs that have been fixed since the release of Exchange 2000
Service Pack 3 (SP3). Exchange 2000 fixes for a particular component are
cumulative and contain all the previous fixes for that component. Fixes with a
particular version number contain all the fixes that have an earlier version
number.

Contact Microsoft Product Support Services (PSS) to obtain
this patch. For a complete list of Microsoft PSS phone numbers and information
about support costs, visit the following Microsoft Web site:

NOTE: In special cases, charges that are ordinarily incurred for
support calls may be canceled if a Microsoft Support Professional determines
that a specific update will resolve your problem. The typical support costs
will apply to additional support questions and issues that do not qualify for
the specific update in question.

The January 20, 2003 release of the Exhange 2000 MDB patch is included in the March 2003 Exchange 2000 Server Post-Service Pack 3 (SP3) Rollup.

For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

813840

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/813840/
)

March 2003 Exchange 2000 Server post-Service Pack 3 rollup

January 20, 2003

The
following file is available for download from the Microsoft Download
Center:

Collapse this imageExpand this image

Download
the 811853 package now.

(http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=84c38949-6a86-4257-beba-a5a2f50fe688&DisplayLang=en)

The January 20, 2003 release
of this patch addresses the following bugs: The English version of this fix has the file attributes (or later)
that are listed in the following table. The dates and times for these files are
listed in coordinated universal time (UTC). When you view the file information,
it is converted to local time. To find the difference between UTC and local
time, use the Time Zone tab in the Date and Time tool in Control Panel.

   Date         Time   Version     Size       File name
   ------------------------------------------------------
   23-Dec-2002  20:18  6.0.6389.0  3,915,776  Cdoex.dll
   23-Dec-2002  20:18  6.0.6389.0  3,567,616  Excdo.dll
   23-Dec-2002  20:04  6.0.6389.0    258,048  Exmime.dll
   23-Dec-2002  20:08  6.0.6389.0  1,691,648  Exoledb.dll
   23-Dec-2002  19:26  6.0.6389.0  2,260,992  Mdbmsg.dll
   23-Dec-2002  19:00  6.0.6389.0     32,768  Mdbrole.dll
   23-Dec-2002  20:03  6.0.6389.0  4,591,616  Store.exe
				

NOTE: Because of file dependencies, this update requires Microsoft
Exchange 2000 Server Service Pack 3.

For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

301378

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/301378/
)

How to obtain the latest Exchange 2000 Server service pack

329359

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/329359/
)

Store stops responding on store!CbStrlenWithNullW

Article ID: 329882 – Last Review: November 2, 2013 – Revision: 4.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbhotfixserver kbqfe kbexchange2000presp4fix kbfix kbinfo KB329882

Read this article:
Post-Exchange 2000 Server Service Pack 3 messaging database fixes that are available

XL97: Compile Error Running Recorded Macro That Uses Solver

When you run a Visual Basic for Applications macro that you created by
using the macro recorder, you may receive the following error message:

Compile error:
Sub or Function not defined

The problem occurs when you run a recorded a macro that uses the Solver
add-
in and you do not reference the Solver add-in.
To resolve the problem, create a reference to the Solver add-in. To create
a reference to the Solver add-in, follow these steps:

  1. Start the Visual Basic Editor (press ALT+F11).
  2. On the Tools menu, click References.
  3. Select Solver.xla, and then click OK.

    NOTE: The Solver.xla file is located in C:Program FilesMicrosoft
    OfficeOfficeLibrarySolver.

The next time you run the macro, this problem does not occur.

This behavior is by design of Microsoft Excel.
For more information about using references, click the Office Assistant in
the Visual Basic Editor, type references, click Search, and then click to
view “Set a Reference to a Type Library.”

NOTE: If the Assistant is hidden, click the Office Assistant button on the
Standard toolbar. If Microsoft Help is not installed on your computer,
please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

120802

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/120802/EN-US/
)

Office: How to Add/Remove a Single Office Program or Component

Article ID: 171750 – Last Review: November 3, 2013 – Revision: 2.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Excel 97 Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kberrmsg kbprb kbprogramming KB171750

Continue Reading:
XL97: Compile Error Running Recorded Macro That Uses Solver

XCON: Configuring X.400 Connectors to Communicate Through a Firewall

This article is intended to provide background information that is helpful in configuring the Exchange Server X.400 Connector to communicate through a firewall.
The following diagram and list of Internet protocol (IP) addresses is an example of the relationship between Exchange Server computers and a firewall:

   Server A <--------> Firewall <--------> Server B

   Server A's IP address:          172.16.1.10
   Firewall's internal IP address: 172.16.1.11
   Firewall's external IP address: 192.168.1.1
   Server B's IP address:          192.168.1.2
				

For the Exchange Server computers to communicate through the firewall using X.400 Connectors, the firewall must allow traffic in both directions over Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) port 102. Firewalls accomplish this using one of two methods, which are described below.

Proxy

The firewall accepts a packet from an Exchange Server computer, encapsulates the packet into a new TCP/IP packet, and then sends this new packet to the destination Exchange Server computer. This new packet appears to have been sent by the firewall instead of the sending Exchange Server computer. The firewall behaves in this manner because of the rules that the system administrator has configured within the firewall.

In an environment where the firewall is configured to behave in this manner, the Exchange Server computers’ X.400 Connectors must be configured to connect to the firewall instead of the destination Exchange Server computer. From the above example, the X.400 Connector installed on the first Exchange Server computer connects to the internal network interface of the firewall. This is accomplished by typing the IP address or fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the firewall’s internal network interface on the Stack tab in the properties for the X.400 Connector. Similarly, the X.400 Connector installed on the second Exchange Server computer connects to the external network interface of the firewall. In the above example, the IP address of 172.16.1.11 is typed on the Stack tab in the properties for the first X.400 Connector and the IP address of 192.168.1.1 is typed on the Stack tab in the properties for the second X.400 Connector.

Pass-Through

The firewall accepts a packet from an Exchange Server computer and forwards it to the destination Exchange Server computer without making any changes. In other words, the firewall routes the packet to the destination Exchange Server computer untouched. Therefore, the packet retains the source IP address of the sending Exchange Server computer.

In an environment where the firewall is configured to behave in this manner, the IP address or FQDN of the destination Exchange Server computer is typed on the Stack tab in the properties for the X.400 Connector. In the above example, the IP address of 192.168.1.2 or the FQDN of the second Exchange Server computer is typed on the Stack tab in the properties for the first X.400 Connector. Similarly, the IP address of 172.16.1.10 or the FQDN of the first Exchange Server computer is typed on the Stack tab in the properties for the second X.400 Connector.

The pass-through method is the preferred method of configuring the Exchange Server X.400 Connector to communicate through a firewall.

Article ID: 199326 – Last Review: November 3, 2013 – Revision: 4.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 4.0 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 5.0 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbinfo KB199326

See more here:
XCON: Configuring X.400 Connectors to Communicate Through a Firewall

XADM: How to Increase the Number of Tracking Logs for Exchange Server

For troubleshooting purposes, it may become necessary to increase or decrease the number of tracking log files for mail in Microsoft Exchange Server. This article describes how to adjust this number.

WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may
require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve
problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own
risk.

The following registry key can be modified to change the number of days covered by the tracking log:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESystemCurrentControlSetServicesMSExchangeSAParametersOldLogsCleaningInterval(Days): Reg_DWORD: 0×7

By changing the OldLogsCleaningInterval(Days) value, you can increase or decrease the number of tracking log files for that Exchange Server computer.

Article ID: 246136 – Last Review: November 2, 2013 – Revision: 4.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbhowto kbinfo KB246136

More here:
XADM: How to Increase the Number of Tracking Logs for Exchange Server

XL2000: Known Issues with Excel 2000 After You Apply the Outlook E-mail Security Update

When the Microsoft Outlook E-mail Security Update is installed, some Microsoft Excel 2000 functionality may change.
For additional information about functionality that may be impaired in Microsoft Excel 2000, click the article numbers below
to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

262876

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/262876/EN-US/
)

XL2000: Changed Macro Behavior with Excel Files

263107

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/263107/EN-US/
)

XL2000: SendMail Method Prompts After You Apply Outlook E-mail Security Update

For more information about how other Microsoft Office
products may be affected by the Outlook E-mail Security
Update, please see one of the following articles in the
Microsoft Knowledge Base, depending on which version of
Outlook you have:

262634

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/262634/EN-US/
)

OL2000: Known Issues with the Outlook E-mail Security Update

262618

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/262618/EN-US/
)

OL98: Known Issues with the Outlook E-mail Security Update

For additional information about the Virus Attachment Security Update, click the article number below
to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

262631

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/262631/EN-US/
)

OL2000: Virus Attachment Security Update Information

Article ID: 263209 – Last Review: November 3, 2013 – Revision: 4.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Excel 2000 Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbhowto KB263209

More:
XL2000: Known Issues with Excel 2000 After You Apply the Outlook E-mail Security Update

Cannot Compare A Workbook Object With ThisWorkbook

In Microsoft Excel, when you use a Visual Basic for Applications procedure
to test whether a Workbook variable is equivalent to a ThisWorkbook object,
the condition incorrectly evaluates to false, even if the variable and the
object are equivalent.
To resolve this problem, use the name property when you compare the two
objects. The Visual Basic code provided below shows how to compare the name
properties.

Microsoft provides examples of Visual Basic for Applications procedures for
illustration only, without warranty either expressed or implied, including,
but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability and/or fitness
for a particular purpose. The Visual Basic procedures in this article are
provided ‘as is’ and Microsoft does not guarantee that they can be used in
all situations. While Microsoft Product Support Services (PSS) professionals
can help explain the functionality of a particular macro, they will not
modify these examples to provide added functionality, nor will they help
you construct macros to meet your specific needs. If you have limited
programming experience, you may want to consult one of the Microsoft
Solution Providers. Solution Providers offer a wide range of fee-based
services, including creating custom macros. For more information about
Microsoft Solution Providers, call Microsoft Customer Information Service
at (800) 426-9400.

Visual Basic Code Example

Sub CompWillWork()
    Dim x as workbook

    For each x in Workbooks
        MsgBox "Value of ThisWorkbook.Name: " & ThisWorkbook.Name _
        & chr(13)& chr(10) & "Value of x.Name: " & x.Name

        If x.Name = ThisWorkbook.name Then
            MsgBox "This Workbook!"
        Else
            MsgBox x.Name
        End If
    Next

End Sub
				

When you run the macro, this subroutine will return the message box “This
Workbook!”

Article ID: 147641 – Last Review: November 2, 2013 – Revision: 2.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Excel 95 Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbprogramming KB147641

More:
Cannot Compare A Workbook Object With ThisWorkbook

ACC2000: Add-in Manager Does Not Display Custom Menu Add-in

This article was previously published under Q214489

This article has been archived. It is offered “as is” and will no longer be updated.

Advanced: Requires expert coding, interoperability, and multiuser skills.

This article applies to a Microsoft Access database (.mdb) and to a Microsoft Access project (.adp).

IMPORTANT: This article contains information about modifying the registry. Before you
modify the registry, make sure to back it up and make sure that you understand how to restore
the registry if a problem occurs. For information about how to back up, restore, and edit the
registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

256986

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/256986/EN-US/
)

Description of the Microsoft Windows Registry

After you use the Microsoft Access Add-in Manager to install a custom menu add-in in Microsoft Access 2000, the custom menu add-in is not listed as an installed menu add-in. However, you are able to use the menu add-in successfully.
The file name of the custom menu add-in that you installed does not have either an .mda or .mde extension. The Add-in Manager only displays installed menu add-ins that have a .mda or .mde extension.
Change the extension of the menu add-in so that it is either .mda or .mde before you install the menu add-in. If your menu add-in is using a USysRegInfo table, you must also change the extension of the file name of the add-in.
Microsoft has confirmed that this is a problem in the Microsoft products that are listed at the beginning of this article.

Steps to Reproduce Behavior

  1. Start Microsoft Access 2000.
  2. Create a new, blank database, and name it MyAddIn.mdb.
  3. Create a new, blank form in Design view.
  4. Add a command button to the form.
  5. Set the OnClick property of the command button to the following event procedure:
    Private Sub Command1_Click()
       MsgBox "My AddIn"
    End Sub
    					

  6. Save the form as frmMyAddIn, and then close it.
  7. Insert a new, blank module into the database, and type the following code in the module:
    Option Compare Database
    Option Explicit
    
    Function StartMyAddIn()
       DoCmd.OpenForm "frmMyAddIn"
    End Function
    					

  8. Save the module as mdlMyAddIn.
  9. On the Tools menu, click Options.
  10. Click the View tab.
  11. Click to select the Hidden Objects and System Objects check boxes, and then click OK.
  12. On the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Import.
  13. In the Files of Type box, select Microsoft Access.
  14. Browse to the 1033 folder of the Microsoft Office installation folder on your computer. By default, this is Program FilesMicrosoft OfficeOffice1033.
  15. Click the Acwzmain.mde file, and then click Import.
  16. In the Import Objects dialog box, click the Tables tab.
  17. Click the USysRegInfo table, and then click OK.
  18. Open the USysRegInfo table in Datasheet view, and delete any records that may be present.
  19. Add the following records to the table:

    Collapse this tableExpand this table

    Subkey Type ValName Value
    HKEY_CURRENT_ACCESS_PROFILEMenu Add-Ins&MyAddIn 0
    HKEY_CURRENT_ACCESS_PROFILEMenu Add-Ins&MyAddIn 1 Library |ACCDIRMyAddin.MDB
    HKEY_CURRENT_ACCESS_PROFILEMenu Add-Ins&MyAddIn 1 Expression =StartMyAddIn()
  20. Close the database.
  21. Open the sample database Northwind.mdb.
  22. On the Tools menu, point to Add-Ins, and then click Add-in Manager.
  23. Click Add New.
  24. In the Files of Type box, click All Files(*.*).
  25. Locate the MyAddIn.mdb file that you created in step 2, and then click Open. Note that MyAddIn is listed as an installed menu add-in.
  26. Click Close to close the Add-in Manager.
  27. On the Tools menu, point to Add-Ins, and then click MyAddIn.

    Note that the add-in form that you created in MyAddIn.mdb opens.

  28. Close the form.
  29. On the Tools menu, point to Add-ins, and then click Add-in Manager.

Note that the menu add-in is no longer listed as being installed.

How to Uninstall Add-ins Not Listed in the Add-in Manager

To uninstall a menu add-in that is not listed in the Add-in Manager, follow these steps.

WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may
require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve
problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own
risk.

  1. Quit Microsoft Access.
  2. Start Registry Editor.
  3. Browse to the following key in the Windows registry:
       HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESoftwareMicrosoftOffice9.0AccessMenu Add-Ins
    					
  4. Under the Menu Add-Ins key, locate the key that represents your menu add-in, and select it.
  5. On the Edit menu, click Delete. When prompted to confirm the deletion of the key, click Yes.
  6. Quit Registry Editor.
  7. Start Microsoft Access.
  8. Open the sample database Northwind.mdb.
  9. On the Tools menu, point to Add-ins.

Note that the custom menu add-in is no longer listed on the Add-ins submenu.

For additional information about add-ins not being displayed in Microsoft Access Project (ADP) files, click the article number below
to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

199316

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/199316/EN-US/
)

ACC2000: Converted Add-In Not Displayed in Access Project

For additional information about creating custom add-ins in Microsoft Access 2000, click the article number below
to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

201735

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/201735/EN-US/
)

ACC2000: How to Create USysRegInfo Table for Installing Add-ins

Article ID: 214489 – Last Review: November 3, 2013 – Revision: 2.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Access 2000 Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbbug kbpending KB214489

Taken from:
ACC2000: Add-in Manager Does Not Display Custom Menu Add-in

ACC2000: Opening Databases as Read-Only Causes Error Message

When you open a database, you may receive the following message:

The database ” is read-only.

You won’t be able to save changes made to data or object definitions in this database.

You may receive this message if you open a database under the following three conditions:

  • The file is read-only, whether or not its file attribute is set to read-only.
  • The folder in which the file resides is read-only.
  • You are using the /Ro command line parameter.

You can use the Microsoft Access security features to make all the objects
in a database read-only without having to implement any of the items above.

Article ID: 209825 – Last Review: November 2, 2013 – Revision: 3.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Access 2000 Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbenv kbinfo KB209825

Read More:
ACC2000: Opening Databases as Read-Only Causes Error Message

ACC97: Input Masks Applied to Zip Code Field Ignored with Label Wizard

When you use the Label Wizard to make mailing labels and include a zip code
field in the same row as other fields, input masks applied to the zip code
field are ignored.
Input masks can only apply to a single field in a single text box. When a
text box on a report contains more than one field, the input masks for
individual fields are ignored.
Use an immediate if (IIf) statement to format the output for the zip code
field. You can change the ControlSource property of the text box that
contains the zip code field in the report’s Design view.

Using an Immediate IF to Format a Text Field

  1. Create the Labels Employees: Report by following the steps in the “Steps
    to Reproduce Behavior” section later in this article.
  2. Right-click the last text box in the Labels Employees: Report, and then
    click Properties on the menu that appears.
  3. In the Properties dialog box, click the Data tab, click in the
    ControlSource property box, and then click the Build button to the right
    of the ControlSource property box to open the Expression Builder.
  4. In the Expression Builder, change the existing formula
         =Trim(City & " " & zip)
    						

    to:

         =Trim(City & " " & IIf(Len(zip)=9,Left(zip,5) & "-" &
            Right(zip,4),zip))
    						
  5. Click OK to close the Expression Builder.
  6. Close the property sheet.
  7. On the File menu, click Save to save the report.
  8. On the File menu, click Print Preview to run the report.
CAUTION: Following the steps in this example will modify the sample
database Northwind.mdb. You may want to back up the Northwind.mdb file
and perform these steps on a copy of the database.

Steps to Reproduce Behavior

  1. Open the sample database Northwind.mdb.
  2. Open the Employees table in Design view. Add a new field named
    Zip, and under Data Type, select Text.
  3. On the General tab, click in the Input Mask row and click the Build
    button to the right of the row. (The button with three dots on it.)
  4. In the Input Mask Wizard dialog box, select “Zip Code” from the Input
    Mask list, and then click Finish.
  5. On the View menu, click Datasheet view. When prompted to save the
    table, click Yes.
  6. Enter the following values into the Zip field for the first five
    records.
           55555-1111
           44444-
           55555-2222
           55455-
           55155-
    						
  7. Close the table.
  8. With the Employees table selected, on the Insert menu, click Report.
  9. Select Label Wizard from the list and click OK.
  10. Accept the defaults for the first two screens by clicking Next.
  11. On the third screen, build the Prototype label by moving the following
    fields to the specified rows of the label:
           First Row:   
           Second Row: 
    Third Row:
  12. Click Next.
  13. Accept the default of no sort field by clicking Next.
  14. Click Finish to create the report.

When the report opens in Print Preview, note that the zip codes are not
formatted according to the Input Mask.

For more information about using input masks, search the Help Index for
“input masks,” and then “Create an input mask to control how data is
entered in a field or control.”

For more information about the IIf() function, see the following Knowledge
Base article:

106288

(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/106288/EN-US/
)

ACC: How to Use the IIf() (Immediate If) Function

Article ID: 185970 – Last Review: November 2, 2013 – Revision: 4.0


Applies to
  • Microsoft Access 97 Standard Edition
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbprb KB185970

See original article:
ACC97: Input Masks Applied to Zip Code Field Ignored with Label Wizard

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